Resonator

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resonator

[′rez·ən‚ād·ər]
(physics)
A device that exhibits resonance at a particular frequency, such as an acoustic resonator or cavity resonator.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Resonator

 

in architecture, a small chamber or vessel placed in the walls and arches of buildings with its aperture toward the interior of the structure. It reinforces sound, acting as an acoustic resonator. A resonator may also be employed as a hollow structural element to lessen the weight of an arch.


Resonator

 

an oscillatory system exhibiting pronounced resonant characteristics. In practice, the term “resonator” is usually applied to an oscillatory system that has distributed parameters, or an infinite number of degrees of freedom. Resonators with elastic oscillations may be strings, diaphragms, acoustic resonators, or rods, for example, the prongs of tuning forks. Electromagnetic resonators may be cavities bounded by conducting walls, systems of mirrors, or crystal plates.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chang, "Sensitivity analysis of single-layer graphene resonators using atomic finite element method," Journal of Applied Physics, vol.
Dual-mode open-loop resonators are well known for their compact size, which is much smaller than the conventional dual-mode loop resonator [15-17].
Therefore, metalenses with WCRRs can transform functionally from cross-polarized focusing to copolarized focusing by independently rotating the unit resonators.
For N numbers of resonators, there would be N-1 notches.
The resonators were actuated by acoustic sources and by piezoelectric electrodes before and after the attachment of the piezoelectrodes under atmospheric pressure, respectively.
The ODE (1b) describes the oscillations in the resonators, where the losses are introduced by f (viscothermic losses) and by n (jet loss due to the difference in inflow and outflow patterns).
2 Design of bandstop filters based on Slotted Complementary Resonators
Gao, et al., "Niobium and Tantalum high Q resonators for photon detectors," IEEE Trans.
Xiao, "Compact dual band bandpass filter using novel E-type resonators with controllable bandwidths," IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters, vol.
Isotropic Resonator. In Figures 4 and 5, two examples of the field distribution for WGMs in the cross sectional xz-plane for both spheroidal (a) and toroidal (b) resonators are shown.
Besides the need for a broadband resonator, multiband resonators are also very demanding to support multioperation with a single resonator element.