Apgar score

(redirected from Respiratory effort)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Respiratory effort: Apgar Score System

Apgar score

[′ap·gär ‚skȯr]
(medicine)
An index used to evaluate a newborn infant's physical condition based on a rating of 0-2 for each of five criteria: heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, response to stimulation, and skin color.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The mean difference of the respiratory rate between the respiratory effort belt and Vital-SCOPE was 0.47 breaths per minute (bpm) with the 95% limit of agreement ranging from -7.4 to 6.5 bpm.
SDB can be divided into obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea (OSA), which is defined as five or more apnea/hypopnea episodes per hour (apnea/hypopnea index, AHI) that occur due to obstruction of upper airways, combined with extreme respiratory effort and central sleep apnea (CSA), which is defined the same as OSA but without traceable respiratory effort during apnea/hypopnea episodes (55-60).
She experienced ocular muscle weakness and worsening respiratory effort resulting in hypoxia and hypercapnia.
Musicians performing wind instruments are particularly prone to the excessive respiratory efforts and a prolonged performance of wind instruments may lead to the respiratory muscles overload [1].
Aside from RR, the nurse should observe for (and document) signs of increased respiratory effort such as nasal flaring, pursed lips, grunting in infants, use of accessory muscles, wheezing or coughing.
After 2 h, child's respiratory pattern altered with poor respiratory effort and Sp[O.sub.2] 60% at 5 liters of oxygen by face and mask.
Physical examination was unremarkable; respiratory effort, mental status, and strength testing were normal.
In cattle, subcutaneous and pulmonary emphysema has been attributed to bellowing in cases of rabies in Southern Africa (SWANEPOEL, 1994), probably due to respiratory effort. However, in the present case, the bull had no bellowing history.
The temperature may be increased slightly, with a more obvious respiratory effort and occasionally a cough.
This suggests that the observed changes in intercostal muscle were not a systemic but a local effect of respiratory effort.
Relationship of respiratory effort sensation to expiratory muscle fatigue during expiratory threshold loading.
The investigators expected that an improvement in expiratory muscle strength following 4 wk of EMST would reduce the sensation of respiratory effort during treadmill exercises.

Full browser ?