care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
The ombudsman ruled that the lack of respite care is likely to have caused Mrs Y increased carer stress.
Furthermore, qualified applicants can apply for a maximum of 21 days of respite care services annually which can help to cover the periods which employers are required by law to grant to their regular foreign caregivers.
"Respite care expanded our circle of caring adults capable of providing high quality care for our son," says one mother.
Claire House provides muchneeded respite care for Charlie, right, and others like him.
Manisha attends the Butterwick Hospice for respite care from Thursdays to Sundays every few weeks, taking part in sensory activities, swimming, physio, soft play, music classes and has the opportunity to interact with other children.
But, when the elderly man became ill and infirm and was taken into respite care, the despicable 33-year-old saw a chance to duplicate his bank card and empty his Post Office account.
A MUM who was left fighting for her life after contracting swine flu has pleaded with the HSE to provide urgent respite care for her intellectually disabled son.
Almost eight million older adults with significant disabilities (in the study, 45.5 percent had dementia, and 34.3 percent had a severe functional disability) live in the community with help from family and unpaid caregivers--but the data also showed that only about one-quarter of caregivers utilize support services like respite care. Contact your local Department of Aging for information about resources for the elderly, and check with the Alzheimer's Association (www.alz.org) for details of respite care and day programs for loved ones with dementia.
Working carers do have some limited rights, as a carer I am denied free respite care.