retrotransposon

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retrotransposon

[¦re·trō·tranz′pō‚zän]
(cell and molecular biology)
A small, mobile deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence that can retrotranspose, that is, move from one genomic location to another by producing ribonucleic acid (RNA) that is transcribed by reverse transcriptase back into DNA which is then inserted at a new site.
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Retrotransposons comprise about 50% of human genome (Amoyyte et al., 2014).
The research team found that an important class of retrotransposons, called L1, can escape from cellular control and begin to replicate in both senescent human cells -- old cells that no longer divide -- and old mice.
In a marine species, octopus Octopus bimaculoides, it was reported that 45% of the genome is composed of high-copy repetitive sequence, which was caused by two extensions of the transposon (e.g., retrotransposons) (Albertin et al.
Even though mammalian and fly Arc evolved from the same class of retrotransposons, the event in flies occurred about 150 million years later.
speltoides has a large genome of 5.5-5.8 pg/1C [26], comprising an extraordinary number of TEs, especially LTR retrotransposons. In the wild, Ae.
SINE retrotransposons cause epigenetic reprogramming of adjacent gene promoters.
retrotransposons (discrete pieces of DNA that can be independently
In Arabidopsis, retrotransposons and transposons are activated during heat stress and are regulated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) (Matsunata et al., 2015).
Transposable elements exist as transposons, which operate via a "cut-and-paste" mechanism, or retrotransposons, which propagate by a "copy-and-paste" mechanism known as retrotransposition.
Sequences aligned to transcribed genomic repeats of L1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons were equally distributed in all blood fractions, with minor variations in L1 subfamilies (Table S3).