Rexists

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rexists

 

(from the Latin motto of the party, Christus Rex, “Christ the King”), the members of a fascist party that existed in Belgium from 1935 to 1944. L. Degrelle was the party’s leader.

In October 1936 the Rexists attempted to seize power by organizing a “march on Brussels,” but their efforts ended in failure. After fascist Germany had seized Belgium in May 1940, they abetted the establishment of the occupation regime in the country and waged a struggle against the resistance. From their ranks there was formed an SS motorized brigade called the Wallonia, which fought against the USSR on the Soviet-German front. (The brigade was routed by Soviet troops in 1944.)

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The five-day congress, which ran from 15 to 20 April, also attracted the attendance of Leon Degrelle, the leader of Belgian Rexists; Wilhelm von Faupel; and Bernhard Rust, Reich Minister of Science, Education and Culture.
In Belgium, the anti-democratic forces, mainly represented by the (francophone) Rexists and the "Vlaamsch Nationaal Verband" and "Verdinaso" on the Flemish side, had gained considerable strength.
In Belgium, the impact of the strong fascist "Rexist" movement was mitigated by the positive intervention of the Catholic cardinal: the "coup de crosse" as it was called.
Conway's judgments on the Rexists are derived by examining their own words and actions from several points of view, the consequences for others, and their place in the interwar and wartime political struggles.
Gradually the Rexists moved from authoritarian constitutional reformers to naive collaborators (1940), to wholeheatted anti-Bolshevik crusaders in the famous Legion Wallonie (1941).
Originally written as an Oxford dissertation, this magnificent study is certainly the definitive treatment of the Rexist role in Occupied Belgium.