Rh incompatibility


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Related to Rh incompatibility: Rh factor, Rhogam, Coombs test, ABO incompatibility

Rh incompatibility

[¦är¦āch ‚in·kəm‚pad·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(medicine)
A condition in which red blood cells of the fetus become coated with immunoglobulin G antibody (Rh antibody) of maternal origin which is directed against Rh-D antigen of paternal origin that is present on fetal cells.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mean and standard deviation of birth weights in babies no blood group incompatibility with mother were 3.0137 and 0.3272 respectively, in babies with OA incompatibility were 3.0521 and 0.2817 respectively, in babies with OB incompatibility were 3.0971 and 0.3219 respectively and in babies with RH incompatibility were 2.8946 and 0.1713 respectively.
Table-1: Total Live births and neonates treated for Year Live Births Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia 2012 2611 364 2013 2978 389 Total 5589 753 Table-2: Factors associated with unconjugated neonatal hyperbilirubinemia Factors Associated Number Percentage Gender Male 403 53.5 Female 350 46.5 Gestational Age Term 506 67.1 Preterm 247 32.9 Birth Weight Low Birth Weight 105 13.9 Very Low Birth Weight 70 9.3 Extremely Low 35 4.6 Birth Weight Parity Primi 490 65.1 Multi 263 34.9 Mode of Caesarean Section 333 44.2% Delivery Normal Vaginal Delivery 420 55.8% Figure-1: Causes of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia Sepsis 87 Cephalohematoma 35 ABO incompatibility 318 Rh Incompatibility 71 Unknown 245 Note: Table made from pie chart.
* a note indicating that IVIG has also been used to treat other conditions in neonates (e.g., Rh incompatibility) and that you can provide summary of this literature as well if the team is interested in exploring broader applicability of this intervention in the NICU
A study by Ashutosh Kumar et al similarly showed that ABO incompatibility was the leading cause of haemolysis (in 48%) followed by Rh incompatibility (in 22%), septicaemia in 26% and G6PD deficiency in 4%.
Conclusions: Knowledge about blood groups, Rh incompatibility and its complications during pregnancy and after child birth was very low and needs to be addressed through public education.
Despite modern obstetrical practices and the availability of Rh immunoglobulin, Rh incompatibility remains the leading cause of HDN.
The full extent of fetal medical conditions related to Rh incompatibility in the Danish sample is not known, the researchers note.
Significant neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia can be caused by prematurity, ABO and RH incompatibility, G6PD deficiency, minor blood group incompatibility or idiopathic aetiology, of which ABO incompatibility is most common aetiology followed by the other causes.
Exclusion criteria was high-risk pregnancies like significant medical illness, recurrent miscarriages, Bad Obstetrical History (BOH), intrauterine death, congenital anomalies, previous uterine scar, multiple pregnancy, mal presentation, significant antepartum haemorrhage and Rh incompatibility.
Blood group has some association with diseases like duodenal ulcer, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, Rh incompatibility and ABO incompatibility of newborn18.
Table 5 shows that: Out of total 520 neonates, 224 (43.07%) had exaggerated physiological jaundice, 108 (20.76%) had ABO incompatibility, 31 (5.96%) had Rh incompatibility, 35 (6.73%) had G6PD deficiency, 36 (6.92%) had sepsis, 15 (2.88%) had cephalhematoma, 7 (1.34%) had intrauterine infection, 6 (1.15%) had breast milk jaundice, 4 (0.76%) had hypothyroidism and 54 (10.43%) were idiopathic jaundice.
The prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the present series was (5.71%) ABO incompatibility was (1.43%) and Rh incompatibility was (5.71%).