Rhaeto-Romanic


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Related to Rhaeto-Romanic: Romansch

Rhaeto-Romanic

(rē`tō-rōmăn`ĭk), generic name for several related dialects of the Romance group of the Italic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Romance languagesRomance languages,
group of languages belonging to the Italic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Italic languages). Also called Romanic, they are spoken by about 670 million people in many parts of the world, but chiefly in Europe and the Western Hemisphere.
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). These dialects are now considered sufficiently similar to form a single unit in the Romance group. The principal Rhaeto-Romanic dialects are Romansh (or Romansch), Ladin, and Friulian. Romansh has about 70,000 speakers in SE Switzerland and is recognized in that country as a national, but "semi-official," language (German, French, and Italian are Switzerland's official languages). Ladin is the tongue of some 20,000 persons in the Italian Tyrol, and Friulian is spoken by approximately 500,000 in Friuli, a region of NE Italy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In neighboring Italy, diverse dialects spoken by almost half a million people are referred to as Rhaeto-Romanic.
German and French are the main languages spoken in Switzerland with a few speaking Italian or Rhaeto-Romanic. The most widely spoken language is German but as it sounds different from standard German, it is sometimes called Schwitzerdeutsch (Page 51, June 30).
Perhaps he believes all Swisscitizens should be compelled to speak Rhaeto-Romanic,or Romansch,a Latin-based language with strands of Rhaeto-Celtic,Italian and German.
The Italian-speaking and Rhaeto-Romanic regions are similar to the German-speaking areas in the emphasis on learning (Rhaeto-Romance is a group of three Romance dialects, including Romansch).
the resulting Rhaeto-Romanic (or Romansh) language could be heard from the Danube to the Adriatic.
All this is a natural result of being located in a place where the German, French and Italian languages meet and where the last gasp of a Romance language called Rhaeto-Romanic, or Romantsch, still clings on.