Rhagionidae


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Rhagionidae

[‚rag·ē′än·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The snipe flies, a family of predatory orthorrhaphous dipteran insects in the series Brachycera that are brownish or gray with spotted wings.

Rhagionidae

 

a family of flies of the order Diptera. Rhagionidae are 5 to 25 mm long and are dark in color. They are predators (they suck the blood of small insects), and many of them feed on earthworms. The larvae live in moist soil, rotten wood, and more rarely in water. There are up to 350 known species of Rhagionidae. They are found in all the countries of the world. There are about 30 species in the European part of the USSR. Rhagio scolopaceus is a widely distributed species. It is about 10 mm long and is yellow gray with dark spots. Rhagionidae usually sit upside down on tree trunks and wait for their prey.

References in periodicals archive ?
abdominale (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae), Chrysophilus ferruginosus (Diptera: Rhagionidae), Sarcodexia innata (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), Onthophagus sp.
Likewise, Brian developed an interest in the 'Rhagionidae' during the same period, and published his first paper on the group in the same year (Stuckenberg 1955b).
In 1965 Brian published a major paper dealing with the Rhagionidae he collected during his two expeditions to Madagascar (Stuckenberg 1965).
In 1965 and 1966 Brian made research visits to various European museums in Austria, Greece, Switzerland, Germany and the United Kingdom, to study types of 'Rhagionidae' and for his on-going revision of Old World Lauxaniidae genera.
In 1973 Brian helped sort out the heterogeneous muddle of diverse brachyceran flies that at that time represented the Rhagionidae (Stuckenberg 1973).
Cleary these species are adapted to nectarivory, although the floral hosts involved and their co-evolution with the flies remain unknown.1 Later Brian provided additional examples of rostrum elongation as a notable adaptation in various families of Diptera, including the Rhagionidae, Tanyderidae, Sciaridae and Ceratopogonidae that are principally associated with the specialised flora of the Cape region of South Africa (Kirk-Spriggs & Stuckenberg 2009: 158-159).
One gull consumed terrestrial invertebrates from five individual orders and seven identified families, including: Hymenoptera: Formicidae (ants), Diptera: Rhagionidae (snipe flies), Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae (scarab beetles), Coleoptera: Elateridae (click beetles), Coleoptera: Carabidae (ground beetles), Lepidoptera: Noctuidae (noctuid moths) and Isopoda: Armadillidiidae (pill bugs).
Ademas hemipteros, neuropteros y dipteros como Asilidae, Xylophagidae y Rhagionidae. Algunos hymenopteros, nematodos y hongos pueden parasitarlos.
Wormlions were once placed in the Family Rhagionidae, but Nagatomi (1977) gave them family status.
[possibly Vermileo niloticus Edwards] (Diptera: Rhagionidae).
Stratiomyiidae, Erinnidae, Coenomyidae, Tabanidae, Pantophthalmidae, Rhagionidae. Museum Nationale Hungaricum, Budapestini, 366 pp.
The genus Chrysopilus Macquart in the Afrotropics: faunal characteristics, a review of the South African species, and descriptions of two new species (Diptera: Rhagionidae).