Rhys ap Gruffydd


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Rhys ap Gruffydd

(rēs äp grĭf`ĭth), 1132?–1197, ruler of South Wales and, after the death (1170) of Owain GwyneddOwain Gwynedd
, d. 1170, prince of North Wales (1137–70). During the troubled reign of King Stephen of England, Owain and other Welsh princes were able to reoccupy much territory earlier wrested from them by the Anglo-Normans.
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, leader of the Welsh princes. The failure (1165) of the English troops under Henry IIHenry II,
1133–89, king of England (1154–89), son of Matilda, queen of England, and Geoffrey IV, count of Anjou. He was the founder of the Angevin, or Plantagenet, line in England and one of the ablest and most remarkable of the English kings.
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 in Wales and Henry's later domestic troubles contributed to Rhys's power. In 1171 he signed a pact with Henry, and he helped the king suppress the rebellion of 1173–74. After Henry's death, however, Rhys revolted against the absent Richard I. The first recorded eisteddfodeisteddfod
[Welsh,=session], Welsh competitive festival. Contests traditionally are held in all the arts and crafts, with special emphasis on music and poetry. The National Eisteddfod is held annually for one week in August, alternately in the north and the south, but local
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 was held by Rhys in Cardigan in 1176.
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His grandson Rhys ap Gruffydd (1132-1197) was, however, given the title Lord -- likely the result of pressure from Henry II of England.
It was once the site of a castle built in 1151 by Welsh Prince, Rhys ap Gruffydd.
Dating back to the 11th century, Cardigan Castle was the location of a festival hosted by Prince of Deheubarth Lord Rhys ap Gruffydd in 1176, an event that has become known as the first Eisteddfod in Wales.
n In 1166 the Welsh prince of south Wales, Rhys ap Gruffydd, conquered Norman holdings in Ceredigion and took control of the area.
'Dafydd ap Gwilym ap Rhys AP Gruffydd ap Ifan ap Jenkyn' came the response.
His grandson Rhys ap Gruffydd (1132-1197) was, however, given the title Lord - likely the result of pressure from Henry II of England.
Lord Rhys ap Gruffydd, the Prince of Deheubarth, seized the fortress from the Normans in about 1170 and rebuilt the timber castle in stone.
Wedyn, clywyd bod un arall o'r ymddiriedolwyr yn gwrthod cwrdd a "this group of bigots" (Cyfeillion Rhys ap Gruffydd, hynny yw) gan ddweud mai gwell eu gadael i "redeg mas o stem".
Rhywbeth fel "Gwarchae'r Castell", neu "Brad Rhys ap Gruffydd" falle.
It was captured by Rhys ap Gruffydd in 1136 and passed back and forth between Welsh and Norman hands over the next century.
In 1166 it was captured by Rhys ap Gruffydd, who rebuilt it in stone in 1171.