Giovanni Battista Riccioli

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Riccioli, Giovanni Battista

 

Born Apr. 17, 1598, in Ferrara; died June 25, 1671, in Bologna. Italian astronomer.

Riccioli’s work A lmagestum novum (New Almagest) was published in 1651. An encyclopedia of the astronomical knowledge of the time, the A Imagestum included the minutes of the trial of Galileo and the text of Galileo’s recantation. It also included a map of the moon, on which craters were named after astronomers.

References in classic literature ?
After him Hevelius, an astronomer of Dantzic, reduced the highest elevations to 15,000 feet; but the calculations of Riccioli brought them up again to 21,000 feet.
As for the first objection, and as the Jesuit in Riccioli might have suspected, absence of evidence was not evidence of absence.
Protagonista dei versi e "un uomo / con abiti e cappello nero / barba e riccioli di fiamma": (56) un ebreo denso di mistero, viaggiatore in un "fumogeno antro'' (57) di terza classe, che raccoglie in se i tratti esemplari che corrispondono per Parise ai piU esatto ideale di poesia.
The committee kept and standardized many names given by Giovanni Battista Riccioli, a Jesuit priest who published the Almagestum Novum in 1651.
He soon met the celebrated Jesuit astronomers Giovanni Battista Riccioli and Francesco Maria Grimaldi, who suggested to the Bolognese Senate that it appoint him as a professor of astronomy.
Remarkably, a new set of names bestowed by Giambattista Riccioli in 1651 did take hold and became the basis of all later lunar nomenclature.
In 1651 Jesuit priest and astronomer Giambattista Riccioli gave the maria designations that reflected states of weather on Earth, names still used today even after it became clear that the maria are solidified lava plains drier than the Sahara.
Exit (UT) Abulfeda E 3 2:25:37 -- -- Aristarchus 5 1:48:50 4 4:21:46 Aristoteles 3 2:13:47 1 4:52:05 Birt 3 2:17:17 2 4:18:21 Campanus 1 2:10:50 1 4:09:06 Copernicus 8 2:00:51 4 4:26:41 Dionysius 7 2:23:15 3 4:41:45 Eudoxus 3 2:14:34 1 4:51:25 Gassendi 2 1:59:53 1 4:07:53 Goclenius 3 2:41:29 1 4:47:25 Grimaldi 4 1:48:01 3 4:05:23 Kepler 4 1:51:58 2 4:18:54 Langrenus 5 2:47:25 2 4:53:00 Manilius 7 2:15:41 4 4:42:18 Menelaus 7 2:19:13 4 4:45:55 Nicolai A 2 2:42:00 -- -- Plato 9 2:05:00 4 4:43:57 Plinius 5 2:23:15 2 4:48:53 Proclus 8 2:34:17 2 4:58:43 Pytheas 6 1:59:12 3 4:30:14 Riccioli 1 1:46:12 1 4:05:50 Taruntius 6 2:37:29 1 4:55:20 Timocharis 3 2:02:41 4 4:36:15 Tycho 11 2:26:57 5 4:07:08
Giovanni Riccioli applied this name 350 years ago to the huge, circular expanse of lava dominating the Moon's northwestern quadrant.
Giovanni Riccioli in 1651, but what he didn't realize was that his broad "bay" is in fact a large crater missing the southern half of its wall.
Take a look at the craters Lagrange, Piazzi, Inghirami, Lamarck, and Riccioli to see the destruction.
Double stars were discovered around 1650, a generation after Galileo died, when Giambattista Riccioli (1598-1671), a Jesuit astronomer and geographer at Bologna, Italy, turned his primitive telescope on Mizar and saw that it was not one star, but two.