Cumberland, Richard

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Cumberland, Richard,

1631–1718, English philosopher. He was bishop of Peterborough from 1691. In his De legibus naturae [on natural laws] (1672) he first propounded the doctrine of utilitarianism and opposed the egoistic ethics of Thomas Hobbes.

Cumberland, Richard,

1732–1811, English dramatist; great-grandson of the 17th-century philosopher Richard Cumberland. His family connections earned him a clerical position with the British board of trade. The author of over 40 plays, he was most successful with his sentimental comedies, the best of which are The Brothers (1769) and The West Indian (1771). He also wrote two seldom-read novels, Arundel (1789) and Henry (1795), and an autobiography (1806–7).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Richard Cumberland's play The Jew was the first English play to have an admirable and virtuous Jew for its hero, an innovation that Irish and American editions immediately underlined by renaming it The Jew; or the Benevolent Hebrew.
(3.) Memoirs of Richard Cumberland (New York, 1806), 305.
(25.) Memoirs of Richard Cumberland, 114, 115, 93, 107, 113.
Nagler in his Sources of Theatrical History quotes Richard Cumberland writing about the new Drury Lane at the end of the 1700s.
Writing in 1772, Richard Cumberland described his approach to comedy as design'd as an attempt upon [the readers] heart, and as such proceeds with little deviation from mine" (1) More than thirty-five years later, he reiterated this sentiment in his Memoirs, stating "there never have been any statute-laws for comedy; there never can be any; it is only referable to the unwritten law of the heart, and that is nature." (2) In essence, then, the affect of comedy is an idealized communion between feeling hearts, made possible through the medium of performance.
(1) Richard Cumberland, Advertisement to The Fashionable Lover (1772), i.
(2) Richard Cumberland, The Memoirs of Richard Cumberland, ed.
Oliver Goldsmith, who might have given him a run for his money, died in 1774, while contemporaries who survived longer - such as Richard Cumberland, a manufacturer of sentimental theatre - couldn't approach Sheridan in popularity.
The Founding, as Amberg tell us, `has been generally accepted by literary historians as the bridge between the comedies of Colley Cibber and Richard Steele in the first part of the century and those of Hugh Kelly and Richard Cumberland in the last' (pp.11-12).
In Richard Cumberland's comedy The Brothers, first performed in 1769 and published in 1770, one character exclaims |Humph!
Cumberland, Memoirs of Richard Cumberland 1807), i.361.
This notes a manuscript called Palamon and Arcite, possibly written by Richard Cumberland, according to a pencilled note on its title page initialled by |P.G.P.' The neatly bound volume is described as the script of a play called Palamon and Arcite, originally given to Mrs Coventry Patmore in 1864, and currently found in the British Library catalogue (Add.