Krafft-Ebing, Richard von

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Krafft-Ebing, Richard von

(rĭkh`ärt fən kräft-ā`bĭng), 1840–1902, German physician and neurologist. Professor of psychiatry at Strasbourg (1872), Graz (1873), and Vienna (1889), he was recognized as an authority on deviant sexual behavior and its medicolegal aspects. His most noted work is Psychopathia sexualis (1886, tr. 1892).
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Richard Krafft-Ebing actively contributed to this new diagnosis of nervosity by proposing that nervous conditions resulted from the overstimulation of an individual's innate nervous resources by the stresses of modern life in the city.
This branch of psychiatry was again closely associated with the clinic's original founder, Richard Krafft-Ebing. The therapeutic regimes offered at Purkersdorf emerged out of a somatic school of psychiatry, thus named because of its core belief in the physiological etiology of nervous conditions--a premise that was about to be soundly rejected by Sigmund Freud, although Freud was equally fascinated by the femme fragile, as evidenced, for example, in his case study of Anna O.
Also in 1892, Richard Krafft-Ebing's influential tome Psychopathia Sexualis was translated and published in the U.S.
(22) The influential sexologist Richard Krafft-Ebing drew heavily on this study for the theories on 'weibliebende Welber' which he developed in the late 1870s and 1880s." Krafft-Ebing considers lesbians to take on male traits, or regard themselves as men in women's bodies:
In the first instance, the budding psycho-medical establishment came to accept the opinions of Richard Krafft-Ebing and Havelock Ellis, whose work was grounded in the premise that some behavior was healthy and some was diseased.