Richard Stallman


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Richard Matthew Stallman
Birthday
BirthplaceNew York City, United States
NationalityAmerican
Occupation
President of the Free Software Foundation
Known for Free software movement, GNU, Emacs, GCC

Richard Stallman

(person)
Richard M. Stallman. Founder of the GNU project. He resigned from the AI lab at MIT so he would be free to produce free software which he could then distribute on his own terms. He went on to establish the Free Software Foundation to support the production of free software and ensure its free distribution.

E-mail: <rms@gnu.ai.mit.edu>.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
The widespread acceptance of this definition and free software itself owes a great deal to Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation.
(23) Sam Williams, Free as in Freedom: Richard Stallman's Crusade for Free Software (Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly & Associates, 2002), 198.
Consequently, Richard Stallman, the founder of FOSS considered that proprietary software limited the number of people use the programmes, limited the rights of users, harmed to the society benefit, obstructed users' adoption throughout ICT, defenced the users' requirements, and encumbered other developers to learn from the programmes or innovation.
Marc Andreessen, John Perry Barlow, Anne-Marie Eklund Lowinder, Francois Fluckiger, Stephen Kent, Henning Schulzrinne, Richard Stallman, ron Swartz (posthumous), Jimmy Wales
(9) On the troubled relationship between GNU and Linux, and on the "GNU/Linux" controversy, see Sam Williams, Free as in Freedom: Richard Stallman's Crusade for Free Software (Sebastopol, CA.: O'Reilly & Associates: 2002), 142-54.
SH: I was interested in open-source software and education and decided to interview a few people like Richard Stallman, and my interests shifted to Web 2.0 software.
(A pithier version of the distinction is the computer scientist Richard Stallman's phrase, "Free as in speech, or free as in beer"--free beer, unlike speech, comes at someone else's expense.) Each movement involved its own divisions, often those of race and class, between those who could afford to prioritize negative rights and, for example, low-income unmarried women, who needed more positive support to achieve equality.
Also absent from the discussion are open-source gurus like Richard Stallman and Linus Torvalds who worried more about the software than the technology.
Richard Stallman (A long time Programmer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology - MIT from 1971 to 1983) founded the movement and introduced GNU (Abbreviation of GNU's Not Unix) manifesto.