Richler


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Richler

Mordecai. born 1931, Canadian novelist. His novels include St Urbain's Horseman (1971), Solomon Gursky Was Here (1990), and Barney's Version (1997)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(11) Much has been written about the work and life of Mordecai Richler; as a frequent contributor to the Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, and other American magazines, Richler was renowned as an outspoken writer in the United States, as well as in Canada.
In The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1959), Mordecai Richler's classic novel of Jewish life in 1940s Montreal, a young man with few resources beyond his wits and a notable lack of morals tries to overcome the hardships society sets in his path.
King's, Richler's, and Atwood's transitional figures register as symptoms of a world gone awry even while they evidence the quixotic power of creativity and the productive potential for disruption that art offers.
On one level the book appears to be an attempt to come to grips with the Cartier of his childhood but unfortunately it gives short shrift to the potentially fascinating social history aspects of the area as described in Richler's stories and novels, with the exception of a repeated return to the Jewish context.
L'ouvrage est d'abord la somme de maintes discussions entre Schleifer, Richler et Londei revelant leur philosophie d'intervention clinique qui s'adresse avant tout a ceux et celles etant preoccupe(e)s de pres ou de loin a l'education des adolescent(e)s telles les parents, les enseignant(e)s, les psychologues, les travailleur(e)s sociaux, les educateur(trice)s attitre(e)s, etc.
Nonetheless, it did serve as the inspiration for two "Phallicdromes" articles in Word Ways (the first by Howard Richler in the Nov 1996 issue and the second by Win Emmons in the May 1997 issue), richly ribald collections well suited to introduce the curious to the fertile field of adult palindromes.
Author Noah Richler writes from a Canadian perspective, focusing on their support of America's conflict in Afghanistan.
Written by Noah Richler, What We Talk About is a vast and involved work, which examines how Canadians view theirs and their country's commitment to international wars and events.
"Year after year, the only big news at the end of the year is that Canadian film didn't do well at the box office," says Telefilm topper Carolle Brabant, who notes that two films last year--"Incendies" and the Mordecai Richler adaptation "Barney's Version"--took home 52 awards around the world and had a combined international gross of $35 million.
"Zoe Whittall might just possibly be the cockiest, brashest, funniest, toughest, most life-affirming, elegant, scruffy, no-holds-barred writer to emerge from Montreal since Mordecai Richler."--The Globe and Mail
From Juvenal to Samuel Johnson to Mordecai Richler, the tradition of satire to which Riche contributes typically attacks society with powerful indignation.

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