Ridley, Hazel

Ridley, Hazel (b. 1900)

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Hazel Ridley was an American direct voice medium. Her psychic development began when she was eighteen. A Native American spirit guide named Grey Wolf suddenly manifested when she was in trance and predicted that she would develop voices. When she did, the voices had a strange whispering quality, issuing from her larynx with no function of her mouth. According to Nandor Fodor, Camden, New Jersey physician

Dr. Wilson G. Bailey testified in his book No, Not Dead; They Live (1923), saying, “I filled her mouth with water and then with salt, and still the voice came through without interruption or impediment and I also punctured her arm when in trance and although I drew blood she did not feel any pain.”

Ridley visited England in 1926, and then again in 1931 and 1932. She also toured the United States. In the book And After, Dennis Bradley accused her of fraud, but without any real evidence for it. Will Goldston, one of the greatest professional stage magicians in Europe, testified to the genuineness of her performances. In Death Unveiled, Mrs. D. U. Fletcher, wife of a Florida Senator, gave details of positive mediumship by Ridley.


Fodor, Nandor: Encyclopedia of Psychic Science. London: Arthurs Press, 1933

Rivail, Léon-Denizard-Hippolyte see Kardec, Allan