Riemann hypothesis

(redirected from Riemann's hypothesis)

Riemann hypothesis

[′rē‚män hī‚päth·ə·səs]
(mathematics)
The conjecture that the only zeros of the Riemann zeta function with positive real part must have their real part equal to ½.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mathematics: ABEGG'S RULE, ABEL'S THEOREM, ARCHIMEDES' PROBLEM, BERNOULLI'S THEOREM, DE MOIVRE'S THEOREM, DE MORGAN'S THEOREM, DESARGUES' THEOREM, DESCARTES' RULE OF SIGNS, EUCLID'S ALGORITHM, EULER'S EQUATION/FORMULA, FERMAT'S PRINCIPLE, FOURIER'S THEOREM, GAUSS'S THEOREM, GOLDBACH'S CONJECTURE, HUDDE'S RULES, LAPLACE'S EQUATIONS, NEWTON'S METHOD/PARALLELOGRAM, PASCAL'S LAW/TRIANGLE, RIEMANN'S HYPOTHESIS
Three years ago, the Clay Institute agreed to award a million dollars to the person who can prove Riemann's hypothesis, which states that there is such a general rule.
For nearly 150 years, mathematicians have puzzled over Bernard Riemann's hypothesis that there is a discernable pattern to the appearance of prime numbers in the infinite string of whole numbers.