Rifled Weapons

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rifled Weapons

 

artillery guns (including cannon and howitzers) and infantry weapons (including pistols, submachine guns, carbines, and machine guns), which, in contrast to smoothbore weapons, have screw-shaped rifling (grooves) on the interior of the barrel. The rotating band of the shell (bullet jacket), which is produced from a soft metal, cuts into the rifling when the shot is made. Projections and depressions are formed in the rotating band, which causes the shell (bullet) to rotate around its axis while traveling through the barrel and to acquire rotational motion in addition to translational motion, thus achieving stability in the air and a greater range of flight.

Rifled weapons (rifled harquebuses and carbines) have been in existence since the early 16th century, but only around the mid-19th century did they come into widespread use (after the loading method was perfected). Rifled infantry, and later artillery, weapons were adopted by all armies during the second half of the 19th century and replaced smoothbore weapons. The use of rifled weapons facilitated the transition to improved ballistically stable bullets and shells, which has increased the range and maximum rate offire.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historians criticize the program of Napoleonic strategy and tactics as antiquated because it did not account for rifled weapons or the particularities of terrain, he says, but these commandants made changes to the programs, developed new textbooks, and instructed cadets who became field generals on both sides of the war.
In other words, forget everything you have been taught (or read) about rifled weapons' increased lethality affecting the outcome of war.
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David White's article ('Born in the USA: A New World of War', June 2010) was most interesting, particularly for quantifying the effect of modern rifled weapons on the battlefield.
The intruders had 2 rifled weapons with optical trackers, Abylkanov said.