Rift Valley fever

(redirected from Rift Valley fever virus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms.
Related to Rift Valley fever virus: RVFV

Rift Valley fever

An arthropod-borne (primarily mosquito), acute, febrile, viral disease of humans and numerous species of animals. Rift Valley fever is caused by a ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus in the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae. In sheep and cattle, it is also known as infectious enzootic hepatitis. First described in the Rift Valley of Africa, the disease presently occurs in west, east, and south Africa and has extended as far north as Egypt. Historically, outbreaks of Rift Valley fever have occurred at 10–15-year intervals in normally dry areas of Africa subsequent to a period of heavy rainfall.

In humans, clinical signs of Rift Valley fever are influenzalike, and include fever, headache, muscular pain, weakness, nausea, epigastric pain, and photophobia. Most people recover within 4–7 days, but some individuals may have impaired vision or blindness in one or both eyes; a small percentage of infected individuals develop a hemorrhagic syndrome and die.

Rift Valley fever should be suspected when high abortion rates, high mortality, or extensive liver lesions occur in newborn animals. The diagnosis is confirmed by isolating the virus from tissues of the infected animal or human. Control of the disease is best accomplished by widespread vaccination of susceptible animals to prevent amplification of the virus and, thus, infection of vectors. Any individual that works with infected animals or live virus in a laboratory should be vaccinated. See Animal virus, Vaccination

Rift Valley fever

[′rift ¦val·ē ′fē·vər]
(medicine)
A toxic generalized febrile virus disease of humans and animals in South and East Africa, transmitted by a mosquito, and characterized by headache, photophobia, myalgia, and anorexia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ruan, "A modeling approach to investigate epizootic outbreaks and enzootic maintenance of Rift Valley fever virus," Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, vol.
Swanepoel, "An inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibody to Rift Valley fever virus in humans, domestic and wild ruminants," Journal of Virological Methods, vol.
Anthony et al., "IgG-sandwich and IgM-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibody to Rift Valley fever virus in domestic ruminants," Journal of Virological Methods, vol.
Evaluation of pathways for release of Rift Valley fever virus into domestic ruminant livestock, ruminant wildlife, and human populations in the continental United States.
Quantifying the potential pathways and locations of Rift Valley fever virus entry into the United States.
Recombinant nucleocapsid-based ELISA for detection of IgG antibody to Rift Valley fever virus in African buffalo.
Comparison of techniques for demonstrating antibodies to Rift Valley fever virus. J Hyg (Lond).
Prevalence of antibodies against Rift Valley fever virus in Kenyan wildlife.
Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to Rift Valley fever virus in ovine and bovine sera.
Rosenfeld for providing rodent samples for the generation of cell lines; Friedemann Weber for providing Rift Valley fever virus clone 13; and Martin Beer and Malte Dauber for providing bovine coronavirus.
Characterization of clone 13, a naturally attenuated avirulent isolate of Rift Valley fever virus, which is altered in the small segment.
Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) periodically causes outbreaks in humans and livestock (1), mostly in sub-Saharan Africa (2,3).