subclavian artery

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Related to Right subclavian: arteria subclavia

subclavian artery

[′səb¦klā·vē·ən ′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
The proximal part of the principal artery in the arm or forelimb.
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The left aortic arch with aberrant right subclavian artery (LRSCA) is the most common congenital aortic arch anomaly, occurring in roughly 1 of every 200 people.
Simultaneous Occurrence of Three Anatomical Variations: Anomalous Right Subclavian Artery, NonRecurrent Inferior Laryngeal Nerve and Right Thoracic Duct.
The presence of an aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) is the most common aortic arch anomaly, present in 0.2-2.5% of the population [4,5].
Consequently, a chest computed tomography with contrast was ordered, revealing a partially thrombosed Kommerell diverticulum in the aberrant right subclavian artery (Fig.
* The right subclavian artery was originating directly from the left-sided AOA distal to the origin of LSCA and having retroesophageal course to come on the right side.
There is no specific problem in pacemaker implantation from the right subclavian vein in patients with bilateral SVC.
Here we report a case of initially misdiagnosed acute aortic dissection in which a dissection flap occluded the ostium of the right coronary artery and right subclavian artery.
To conclude, our patient with history of CVA and a bad obstetric history now presented to us with inability to use the right upper limb caused by thrombosis and occlusion of the right subclavian artery.
Blood flow in the left subclavian vein to the left internal jugular vein is interrupted, while inflow of contrast medium is noted into the right subclavian vein via a collateral vessel (arrowhead in (a)).
A Doppler ultrasonography (US) of the right upper limb showed an echogenic thrombosis in the right subclavian vein.
MRI confirmed compression in her right subclavian artery within the interscalene triangle triangle distally (Figure 1).