Rigidity


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rigidity

[ri′jid·əd·ē]
(astrophysics)
The ratio of the momentum of a cosmic-ray particle to its electric charge, in units of the electron charge.
(mechanics)
The quality or state of resisting change in form.

Rigidity

 

the capability of a body or structure to resist deformation; a physicogeometric characteristic of the cross section of a structural element. In the case of simple deformations within the limits of Hooke’s law, rigidity is determined numerically as the product of the modulus of elasticity E (on elongation-contraction and on flexure) or G (on shear and torsion) and some geometric characteristic of the element cross section:EF on elongation-compression, El on flexure, GF on shear, and so on, where F is the cross section area, and I is the axial moment of inertia. The concept of rigidity is being widely used in the solution of problems concerning the strength of materials.


Rigidity

 

in physiology, a functional state of the skeletal muscles, characterized by a marked increase in their tone and in their resistance to deformation. Muscle rigidity results from changes in the character of the neural influences that the central and peripheral nervous systems continuously exert to the muscles. An example of rigidity is decerebrate rigidity.

In man, injuries and disturbances of the central nervous system and pathological irritation of the peripheral nerves give rise to various manifestations of muscle rigidity. Thus, poisoning by certain toxins, diseases of the nervous system, and hypnosis may cause a state of plastic tone, characterized by a waxlike condition of the muscles. In this state the extremities may easily be placed in any position and can remain thus, unchanged, for a prolonged period. Plastic tone characterizes a state of the nervous system called catalepsy, or plastic rigidity.

rigidity

That property of a material which resists a change in its physical shape.

rigidity

i. The resistance offered by a body when under load. It is the ratio of the stress to the strain. Also known as stiffness
ii. A property of a gyroscope by which its axis will remain in a fixed direction in space unless the rotor is acted upon by an external torque.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the social and private costs of price rigidity are second-order in terms of the variance of monetary disturbances;
Ainm Spartacus takes a drop in class, but his trainer Kieran Purcell still fears Rigidity.
2.10 YOUNG SIMON, 2.40 RIGIDITY, 3.10 NOVERRE OVER THERE, 3.40 VICTOIRE DE LYPHAR, 4.10 SPRING JIM, 4.40 SABORIDO, 5.10 LOUISIADE.
This leads to a substantial increase of flexural rigidity of the structure, on the whole, without a significant increasing in its entire weight (Davies, 2001; Donaldson & Miracle, 2001).
So the point is: Try hard to keep or cultivate flexibility and beware of "brand-like" rigidity. We will stand a better chance to manage and cope with grief over the long run.
The penis of the patient was connected to the RigiScan™ Plus device according to the instruction manual, and the device automatically determined the baseline penile rigidity and tumescence for the first 15 min.
Due to the previous government's incompetency and rigidity Pakistan now stands as number 3 in line of the countries facing water crisis.
'Due to incompetency and rigidity of the previous governments, the dams could not be constructed as result, there is water scarcity in the country.
Davao City Mayor Sara Duterte-Carpio said if not for her father President Duterte's rigidity, she would not have been what she is today.
Variations in the ratio of cable rigidity to girder stiffening may result in a reduction of the vertical displacements of the bridge and assist in providing rigidity for the complete structure.
They illustrate them with fundamental theorems such as Gromov's Theorem on groups of polynomial growth, Tits' Alternative Theorem, Mostow's Rigidity Theorem, Stallings' Theorem on ends of groups, and theorems of Tukia and Schwartz on quasi-isometric rigidity for lattices in real-hyperbolic spaces.
Ferrari claims the "extensive use of modern production technologies" has allowed the gains in rigidity and the loss in weight.