Rigorism


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rigorism

 

strict adherence to a principle in action, conduct, and thought, excluding any compromise or consideration of principles differing from the ground principle. Moral rigorism is characteristic of such movements in Protestantism as Puritanism. In ethics, the principle of rigorism was formulated by I. Kant in his doctrine of duty as the sole criterion of morality. According to Kant, only acts prompted by motives of duty can be considered moral. Acts which in themselves do not contradict the requirements of duty and which may even answer those requirements cannot be considered moral if they were performed for other motives, such as natural inclination.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
One way to understand American missionaries' religious-ethical rigorism is to think of it in relation to their desire to ensure the purity of the church.
Russo on the one hand assimilates Marivaux to this tradition based on his literary resistance to illusion, but on the other hand emphasizes his oft-repeated criticism of typically Augustinian moral rigorism. She is correct in the content of both of these assessments, but her characterization of the form of Marivaux's Augustinianism is paradoxical: 'one could see Marivaux's morality as a kind of Augustinianism lite: the acceptance of human dualism opens onto an ironic acceptance of worldly immanence rather than onto a refuge in transcendence' (p.
Montanism appealed to Tertullian's zealous moral and ascetic rigorism and his antagonism towards secular culture.
Returning from his first stay in the Middle East, Ziyauddin Babakhan brought with him many Hanbali publications, whose rigorism and puritanism corresponded well to the precepts taught by the disciples of Shami-damulla in the framework of Ahl al-hadith.
Rejecting the Sacraments and believing that all matter was evil, they held a moral doctrine of extreme rigorism, condemning marriage and the use of all animal products" (Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church).
It is stronger even than the rigorism of the Hays Office....
In his reading of the work, Mandeville originally attacks real or pretended rigorism, but beginning in 1723, he adds strong criticism of benevolism as being equally mistaken in its view of human nature (340).
By referring to the limits of universal philosophical systems, Hume's "sceptic" reflexively investigates the conditions of morality, though in a manner very different from Kant's ethical rigorism. I shall briefly return to this idea toward the end of this article.
Legal norms protect a community against moral rigorism as well as political arbitrariness.
"In the case of the Puritans..., [this] belief in predestination often produced ethical rigorism, legalism, and rationally planned procedures for the patterning of life." Consequently, the "inner-worldly asceticism and the disciplined quest for salvation in a vocation pleasing to God were the sources of the virtuosity in acquisitiveness characteristic of the Puritans" [14:203].