Girdling

(redirected from Ring barking)
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Girdling

 

in trees and grapevines, a notched ring or the removal of a ring of bark (3–5 mm wide) right up to the wood. The trunk or the skeletal branches of apple and pear trees are girdled. In grapevines the main trunk, perennial branches, or annual shoots are girdled. Girdling is performed in early spring. The wound is covered with grafting wax or opaque paper. As a result of girdling, fruit trees bear fruit earlier and are more productive. In grapevines the conditions for setting the berries is improved and the size and sugar content is increased; the grapes also ripen quicker.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is believed that several trees protected under Tree Preservation Orders were pulled down, or damaged by ring barking - cutting the bark which stops the food supply.