Girdling

(redirected from Ringbarking)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.
Related to Ringbarking: girdled

Girdling

 

in trees and grapevines, a notched ring or the removal of a ring of bark (3–5 mm wide) right up to the wood. The trunk or the skeletal branches of apple and pear trees are girdled. In grapevines the main trunk, perennial branches, or annual shoots are girdled. Girdling is performed in early spring. The wound is covered with grafting wax or opaque paper. As a result of girdling, fruit trees bear fruit earlier and are more productive. In grapevines the conditions for setting the berries is improved and the size and sugar content is increased; the grapes also ripen quicker.

References in periodicals archive ?
According to the owners of Mount Drysdale, Michael and Shirley Mitchell, several hundred Chinese men were engaged in ringbarking on an adjoining property.
The Chinese camps and ringbarking activities were not confined to the larger Riverina towns and their immediate environs.
Gow commented that the ringbarking was shunned by most European bush labourers, who called it 'Chinamen's work'.
In 1881 a correspondent in the Sydney Morning Herald reported that ringbarking of trees upon pastoral leases had increased 'to an alarming extent' as there were 'perfect armies of Chinamen [sic] going about ringbarking every tree at the rate of 9d per acre'.
The price for clearing scrub and ringbarking the old pines ranged from 1s.
The ringbarking frontier had obviously spread well north of Cobar by the 1890s and by the turn of the century possibly into Queensland as well.