ratio

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ratio.

The ratio of two quantities expressed in terms of the same unit is the fraction that has the first quantity as numerator and the second as denominator. For example, if in a group of 100 people 5 die, the ratio of deaths to the total number in the group is 5/100=1/20=.05. Ratios are indicated also by writing the two values with a colon between them, e.g., the ratio of 4 to 8 can be expressed by 4:8 as well as by 4/8.

Ratio

A relationship in magnitude, quantity, or degree between two or more similar things.

Ratio

 

The ratio of two numbers is the quotient from the division of the first number, by the second. The ratio of two homogeneous magnitudes is the number obtained by measuring the first magnitude when the second is chosen as the unit of measurement. If two magnitudes are measured in the same unit of measurement, their ratio is equal to that of the numbers that measure them.

The ratio of the lengths of two segments may be expressed by a rational or irrational number. In the former case the segments are said to be commensurable, and in the latter incommensurable. Mathematicians of the ancient world had no knowledge of irrational numbers. For them the concept of the ratio of two segments did not reduce to the concept of number. In their conception the geometrical theory of the ratios of magnitudes was not connected with the concept of number and played an independent role. In a sense, it substituted for a theory of real numbers. Indeed, according to Euclid the four segments, a, b, a’, and b’ form the proportion a: b = a’:b’ if for any natural numbers m and n one of the relations ma = nb, ma > nb, ma < nb is satisfied simultaneously with the corresponding relation ma’ = nb’, ma’> nb’, or ma’ < nb’. It follows that when a and b are incommensurable the subdivision of the rational numbers (x = m/n) into two classes according to whether a > xb or a < xb coincides with the subdivision according to whether a’ > xb’ or a’ < xb’ —this is the idea behind the modern theory of Dedekind cuts.

ratio

[′rā·shō]
(mathematics)
A ratio of two quantities or mathematical objects A and B is their quotient or fraction A / B.

ratio

Maths a quotient of two numbers or quantities
References in periodicals archive ?
The only variable that met the significance criterion to enter the equation was the child poverty risk ratio for Hispanic children.
The primary method used in this study, the relative risk ratio, is common in the disproportionality literature and in state practices for meeting the requirements of special education law (Sullivan et al.
This paper proposes a general method for estimating risk ratios and risk differences from nonlinear multiple regression analysis, using the example of logistic regression.
The risk ratio and the sampling error are only the start of an inquiry into the reliability of scientific evidence.
As one would expect, statistical power increases as the number of clinical failures increases, assuming that both the prevalence rate of the abnormal marker and the risk ratio in question remain constant.
This is reflected in the much higher Relative Risk Ratio of Arab to Jewish women in cases of mortality from breast cancer, compared to its incidence, implying later detection among Arab women and possibly earlier incidence among Jewish women.
Patients without systolic activity or a pulse were least likely to survive to discharge, but they also benefited most from longer revival efforts (adjusted risk ratio for longest versus shortest quarter 1.
The risk ratio of smoking compared with not smoking for coronary heart disease was found to be 25 per cent higher in women than men.
3% (140/627), respectively, with a prevalence risk ratio of 0.
After controlling for fluoride intake and otitis media (OM), the risk of fluorosis on the maxillary central incisors was significantly associated with amoxicillin use from 3-6 months of age, with a risk ratio of 1.