River Tow

River Tow

 

a river transport unit consisting of a self-propelled vessel and one or several dumb vessels, such as barges. A distinction is made between towed and pushed units, depending on the type of self-propelled vessel used. Some river tows are equipped with devices to force the line of towed or pushed vessels to bend in a turn according to the radius of the ship’s path. River tows have capacities up to 20,000 tons of dry and liquid cargo.

References in periodicals archive ?
The estimated coal capacity of a tow would be 13,300 metric tons (mt), similar in capacity to a typical Ohio River tow.
A typical lower Mississippi River tow -- that's industry speak for a tugboat and the numerous barges it pushes and steers -- is comprised of 30 to 45 barges.
A gate at the bottom of the garden gives access to the river tow path and, said James, anyone who wants to take a boat could slip the moorings and be in the heart of Stratford in about 30 minutes.
So multiply that by 15 to apply to the typical Mississippi River tow churning past carrying coal, stone, fertilizers, and grain.
An Internet veteran, Harrington conceived and carried out the implementation of a comprehensive vessel management and back-office system at Kirby, linking river tow boats via satellite to provide centralized fleet planning, dispatching, activity reporting, invoicing, revenue reporting and direct customer Internet interface for activity reporting and requirements input.