River Tow

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

River Tow

 

a river transport unit consisting of a self-propelled vessel and one or several dumb vessels, such as barges. A distinction is made between towed and pushed units, depending on the type of self-propelled vessel used. Some river tows are equipped with devices to force the line of towed or pushed vessels to bend in a turn according to the radius of the ship’s path. River tows have capacities up to 20,000 tons of dry and liquid cargo.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Janie was a retired cook on River Tow Boats for the American Commercial Co.
A typical lower Mississippi River tow -- that's industry speak for a tugboat and the numerous barges it pushes and steers -- is comprised of 30 to 45 barges.
A gate at the bottom of the garden gives access to the river tow path and, said James, anyone who wants to take a boat could slip the moorings and be in the heart of Stratford in about 30 minutes.
So multiply that by 15 to apply to the typical Mississippi River tow churning past carrying coal, stone, fertilizers, and grain.