Riveting Hammer

riveting hammer

[′riv·əd·iŋ ‚ham·ər]
(mechanical engineering)
A hammer used for driving rivets.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Riveting Hammer

 

a hand-held percussion machine used to drive rivets. They are small, weighing 1.5 to 4 kg, and facilitate riveting in poorly accessible spots of structural frames, inside articles being assembled, and in assembly jigs. Compressed air is used to drive a piston enclosed in the housing of a riveting hammer. The piston delivers strokes to a riveting die placed on the rivet. In actual operation the hammer is held by a riveter. A helper holds a riveting dolly, which is placed on the head of the rivet. The quality of the joint depends to a great extent on the operator’s skill. Riveting hammers are currently being replaced by heavier riveting machines in order to achieve better working conditions and to improve the quality of output.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

riveting hammer

A hammer having a long head, a flat face, and a narrow peen; used for swaging down rivets or beating sheet metal.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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* Pneumatic riveting hammer, described as HAMMER, PNEUMATIC, PORTABLE 5130-01-5716908.