Rizpah


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Rizpah

(rĭz`pə), in the Bible, Saul's concubine, Aiah's daughter, who held watch over her dead sons on Mt. Gibeah.
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Sidney and Angelina are the proud owners of four dogs: CH Command, Angelina's service dog (a Bouvier Des Flandres), Rizpah (a Bouvier Des Flandres), Optimus Prime (a Black Russian Terrier), and Colonel Bentley (an English Bulldog).
This is most clearly conveyed in the collection's culmination -- a lengthy portrayal of Rizpah, a concubine to Saul and the mother of sons who were killed by David when he ascended to the throne.
JACOBI, Pedro Roberto; BESEN, Gina Rizpah. Gestao de residuos solidos em Sao Paulo: desafios da sustentabilidade.
The stories of Rizpah (2 Samuel), Zacchaeus (Luke), and Amos furnish models for righteous resistance to overwhelming power, reconciliation, and vocal protest, respectively.
In a series of fifteen sonnets entitled Female Characters of Scripture (Blackwood's, April 1833), for example, Hemans revisits biblical female figures (from Judah to Miriam, from Ruth to Rizpah, and from the Virgin Mary to Mary Magdalene) to honor them and to reclaim their legacy.
The five women and two girls studied in this book are Miriam, the sister of Moses in her childhood role; Rizpah, a concubine of king Saul; the wise woman of Abel Beth Maacah, an important character in the story of Absalom; the anonymous wife of Jeroboam, the first king of North Israel; the widow of Zarephath; an Israelite slave girl who sent Naaraan to be cured in Israel; and Athaliah, the only reigning queen in the Bible.
"Rizpah," for example, has an auditor throughout and a clear rhetorical purpose--establishing the superior claims of maternal rights over legal codes regarding a son's bones--but the speaker is dying and wanders in and out of self-aware control.
We are left with "the image of this woman, this mother, this Rizpah Bat Aiah, who for six months watches over the corpses ..." (p.
Sometimes we are privy to their Bible-study conversations, around the widow of Zarephath, say, or the obscure and agonizing text of Rizpah, the grieving mother.
Rizpah, Prisca, Margaret Laurence, Jean Vanier, Tolstoy, Jane Austen, Wole Soyinka
Consider, for example, Rizpah, the concubine of King Saul: who knows about her?