Rjukan


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Rjukan

(rēo͞o`kän), town, Telemark co., S Norway, on the Rjukanfoss, one of several high waterfalls of the Måne River. Its large power stations supply electricity to saltpeter and chemical fertilizer factories. At nearby Vemork a plant for making heavy water was destroyed by Norwegian commandos (Feb., 1943) in World War II; this action helped prevent the Germans from manufacturing an atomic bomb. The plant was rebuilt after 1945.
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To inject the sample, a CTC PAL Auto Sampler was used (CTC Analytics AG, Zwinger, Switzerland), injecting 1.0 [micro]L at a split ratio of 1:10 into an injection chamber set to 250[degrees]C and using helium as a carrier gas (99,9999%, Yara, Rjukan, Norway) at a constant flow of 1mL/min.
They were headed to Norway, to a place called Rjukan.
Data were collected via video and field notes on weekend residential visits to Rjukan, Norway, with beginners' ice-climbing courses (each lasting the two days of the weekend).
But consider what the residents of Rjukan, Norway, have had to endure for years.
Rjukan: Residents of a remote village nestled in a steep-sided valley in southern Norway are about to enjoy winter sunlight for the first time ever thanks to giant mirrors.
Rjukan is not only a long way north, on a similar latitude to Oslo, but it also has the added problem that it's positioned at the bottom of a steep valley.
Helicopters hoisted the reflectors 450 metres above Rjukan, 100 miles west of Norway's capital, Oslo.
The Norwegian town of Rjukan is shrouded in darkness for five months every year, but a project completed this month promises to bring a bright spot to the town's central square via the recently completed installation of a series of massive mirrors that will reflect sunlight onto the meeting spot.
On the second stage of their trip, the veterans will retrace steps of the attack route on Hitler's nuclear plant at Rjukan.
[T]he Fuhrer counted an atomic bomb among the Wunderwaffen, the wonder weapons, he expected to hurl against Germany's enemies...." But in April 1943 the New York Times "reported that Allied saboteurs had blown up the huge electrochemical Norsk-Hydro plant at Rjukan in Nazi-occupied Norway ...
S&P also noted that Norsk Hydro plans to invest NOK850m in the upgrade of the Rjukan hydropower system in Telemark.
An advance party of four Norwegians had already parachuted onto the Hardanger Plateau, at Rjukan where the Norak hydro-electric works was in operation.