RoHS


Also found in: Acronyms.

RoHS

(Reduction Of Hazardous Substances) European Union regulations enforceable on July 1, 2006 that set maximum concentration limits on hazardous materials used in electrical and electronic equipment. The substances are lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE).

Exceptions
Depending on the device being manufactured, there are exceptions. For example, lead in solders used in high-reliability applications for which there is no known substitute. Mercury is permitted in limited quantities in some fluorescent lamps while unrestricted in other types. For more information, visit the European Underwriters Laboratories at www.ul-europe.com/en/solutions/services/rscs.php.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
The "REACH and RoHS Compliance: Gain a Deeper Understanding" conference has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.
Protected health information company ScanSTAT Technologies reported on Tuesday the election of Matt Rohs as its new president.
In common with previous RoHS Directive updates, these most recent changes apply to cables and spare parts for the repair, re-use and updating of a device's functionality or capacity upgrade, with one exemption.
The extended EU Directive 2011/65/EC (RoHS II) became valid at the beginning of the year, therefore tightened the permissible limits for hazardous substances in more and more areas.
The FAQ document (ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/rohs_eee/events_rohs3_en.htm) is intended to help interpret provisions of RoHS 2 to ensure compliance with the Directive's requirements.
What the reader comes away with is that Rohs, despite some happy memories, grew up disconnected with his world.
TBBPA, a reactive flame retardant used in most printed circuit board laminates, has been reported to be included among five substances for priority assessment and potential inclusion in RoHS by media who claimed to have seen the proposal.
Guided by an operating philosophy that only full, methodical and thorough product testing will ensure that the RoHS regulations are satisfied, a number of the leading developers and sellers of analytical instrumentation have been tailoring selections from their current testing arsenals to fit the needs created by RoHS regulations.
Backtracking a bit, RoHS regulations have their genesis in Europe, where the buildup of hazardous waste in landfills was generating significant environmental concerns.
The RoHS is part of a group of legislation passed in recent years that has had a significant impact on the electronics industry.
The proper name for RoHS is Directive 2002/95/EC, "The Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment." RoHS applies to the following substances for electronic equipment and electrical appliances: lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, PBB (polybrominated biphenyls), and some PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers).