RoHS


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RoHS

(Reduction Of Hazardous Substances) European Union regulations enforceable on July 1, 2006 that set maximum concentration limits on hazardous materials used in electrical and electronic equipment. The substances are lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE).

Exceptions
Depending on the device being manufactured, there are exceptions. For example, lead in solders used in high-reliability applications for which there is no known substitute. Mercury is permitted in limited quantities in some fluorescent lamps while unrestricted in other types. For more information, visit the European Underwriters Laboratories at www.ul-europe.com/en/solutions/services/rscs.php.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protected health information company ScanSTAT Technologies reported on Tuesday the election of Matt Rohs as its new president.
htm) is intended to help interpret provisions of RoHS 2 to ensure compliance with the Directive's requirements.
Backtracking a bit, RoHS regulations have their genesis in Europe, where the buildup of hazardous waste in landfills was generating significant environmental concerns.
China has enacted a law similar to RoHS, called "Administration on the Control of Pollution Caused by Electronic Information Products.
For example, many manufacturers of electronic and electrical equipment do not know that the RoHS directive is aimed at the lowest level of the product structure (the homogeneous material) and not the finished product.
China RoHs is the primary regulation that, when supplemented by additional implementing measures, forms China's emerging RoHs legal regime.
Especially in Europe, directives such as RoHS, WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment directive) and ELV (End of Life Vehicles directive) either ban the use of hazardous chemical substances in products, or make it mandatory to eliminate them.
Manufacturers must adhere to significant, and potentially costly, compliance requirements in order to meet the RoHS deadline of July 1, 2006.
The RoHs Directive regulates the use of toxic materials in electrical and electronic equipment and calls for the elimination of lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium and two brominated flame retardants by July 1, 2006.
Over the past year, NDS has dedicated a cross-functional team to achieve RoHS compliance by working with external suppliers and internal personnel to implement, control, document, and ensure compliance with this environmental standard.
The free RoHS eBook incorporates new rules invoked last September, and will eventually include a range of additional electronics and electrical products not previously covered by the European environmental legislation.
Recognising the challenge that businesses such as RS face in demonstrating to their customers that they are taking all reasonable steps to comply with the RoHS Directive, BSI Product Services has launched the Kitemark to allow businesses to prove that they are "RoHS Trusted" suppliers.