Road diet


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Road diet

A technique of transportation planning in which the width of a road or lane is narrowed in order to achieve improvements to the transportation system. A typical road diet technique is to reduce the number of lanes on a roadway cross section. The additional space that is freed up by removing a vehicular lane can be converted into two bike lanes on either side of the roadway.
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References in periodicals archive ?
MMDA traffic czar Bong Nebrija said this is part of the agency's "road diet" proposal: to fence off two lanes, each measuring 3.
These include the so-called "Road Diet" that would trim down the width of EDSA lanes from 3.4 meters to 2.8 meters by adjusting the lane markers to have more lanes to cope with the large volume of vehicles.
But there are some differences, including the county's sixth roundabout and an inaugural "road diet" project.
Jojo Garcia, MMDA general manager, said this would be made possible once the so-called road diet proposal pushes through.
The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority is considering designating an exclusive lane for motorcycles along Edsa once the 'road diet' initiative pushes through, MMDA general manager Jojo Garcia said on Thursday.
On Temple Street, where 34 people were killed or severely injured within 2.3 miles in eight years, a "road diet" expected to reduce crashes by up to 47% met backlash from residents and drivers.
The city decided to implement a road diet, reducing its Main Street from four lanes to three and using the freed space to create sidewalks and a bicycle lane.
The latest MMDA proposal is the 'road diet,' which involves reducing the width of Edsa lanes from 3.4 meters to 2.8 meters.
"We call it a road diet,'" MMDA spokesperson Celine Pialago told reporters in a press conference Thursday morning.
The New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT) is one of the agencies that set a goal to institutionalize road diets during EDC-3- After reviewing other States' road diet policies and learning about their deployment experiences through a peer exchange, NMDOT developed its Road Diet Guide for practitioners to use in assessing the appropriateness of facilities for roadway reconfiguration.
Both Berryman and Brown said an important consideration in their final judgment is whether the "road diet" interferes with the ability of emergency vehicles and buses to travel the corridor.
'We doubt this 'road diet' scheme will solve the traffic problem on Edsa,' the Road Users Protection Advocates (Rupa) said in a statement.