Robert of Jumièges

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Robert of Jumièges

(zhümyĕzh`), fl. 1037–52, Norman churchman in England, b. Normandy. As abbot of Jumièges he won the favor of Edward (later Edward the ConfessorEdward the Confessor,
d. 1066, king of the English (1042–66), son of Æthelred the Unready and his Norman wife, Emma. After the Danish conquest (1013–16) of England, Edward grew up at the Norman court, although his mother returned to England and married the
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) during Edward's exile in Normandy. He went (1043) to England with the king and received the bishopric of London (1044), becoming archbishop of Canterbury in 1051. A leader of the Norman party of the king, Robert opposed the powerful Earl GodwinGodwin
or Godwine
, d. 1053, earl of Wessex. He became chief adviser to King Canute, was created (c.1018) an earl, and was given great wealth and lands. After Canute's death (1035) Godwin and Queen Emma, Canute's widow, supported the claims to succession of her son
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 and helped send him into exile in 1051. Upon Godwin's return Robert fled to France, was later outlawed by the hostile English, and never succeeded in returning to his see, despite the support of the pope.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1042-66), was half-Norman and had spent most of his life in the Duchy of Normandy before returning to England in 1041 with his part-Norman nephew Ralph and trusted Norman cleric Robert of Jumieges. The Victorian view that Edward brought a large contingent of Normans with him to England was disproved by 20th-century historians but by summer 1051 Robert of Jumieges was Archbishop of Canterbury and within a year there were likely to have been three Norman castles in England, all in the border county of Herefordshire.
The second argument relies on the similarities between Junius and other later calendars in the manuscripts known as the Bosworth Psalter, the Missal of Robert of Jumieges, and the Claudius Pontificals, all of which are also ascribed to Christ Church, Canterbury by the author; I have yet to be persuaded that these do not come from St Augustine's, Winchester or Worcester - if one accepts every manuscript of undetermined origin as coming from Christ Church, it will follow naturally that the earliest of them, Junius, can be thus made to fit into that same category.
In 1051 Edward's insistence on appointing a Norman, Robert of Jumieges, as Archbishop of Canterbury against Godwin's wishes raised the temperature and tensions came to a head at the beginning of September when there was a violent affray at Dover between some of the townsfolk and the retinue of Count Eustace of Boulogne, who was on a visit to King Edward.
A case in point concerns the spectacular Missal of Robert of Jumieges, a lavishly illuminated book apparently made as a presentation copy to be given away as a princely gift when an appropriate recipient came along.