Rock Cut State Park


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Rock Cut State Park


Location:Northern Illinois, 1.5 miles north of the Riverside Blvd exit off I-90, north of Rockford in Winnebago County.
Facilities:208 Class A-Premium campsites, 60 Class B-Premium campsites, primitive cabin (has electricity but no water or plumbing facilities), equestrian campground, showers and flush toilets (é) in campground area, picnic areas with pit toilets, playgrounds, concession, restaurant, hiking trails (40 miles), mountain bike trails (23 miles), equestrian trails (14 miles), swimming beach, 2 boat ramps, boat docks, fishing piers (é).
Activities:Camping, boating (10 HP limit), fishing, swimming, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, cross-country skiing, ice fishing.
Special Features:Blasting operations through rock, conducted by railroad crews in 1859, gave Rock Cut State Park its name. Park includes both a fishing lake and a separate lake especially for swimming.
Address:7318 Harlem Rd
Loves Park, IL 61111

Phone:815-885-3311
Web: dnr.state.il.us/Lands/Landmgt/PARKS/R1/ROCKCUT.HTM
Size: 3,092 acres.

See other parks in Illinois.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
- and, camping at Camp Napowan, Rock Cut State Park and more
In July 1995, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) investigated an outbreak in which 12 children who had gone swimming at a bathing beach in Rock Cut State Park in northern Illinois became ill with E.
All stool isolates that came from cases visiting Rock Cut State Park (n = 6) had identical PFGE patterns, and all six isolates produced Type I and Type II shiga-like toxins.
The acquired land is known as the Olson Annex to Rock Cut State Park. The Olson Lake beach opened on Memorial Day weekend in 1990.
After the initial investigation by the Winnebago County Health Department and IDPH implicated the lake at Rock Cut State Park, a matched case-control study was conducted to firmly establish whether swimming in the lake was associated with illness.