Rock Ptarmigan


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rock Ptarmigan

 

(Lagopus mutus), a bird of the family Tetraonidae, order Galliformes. The rock ptarmigan measures approximately 35 cm in length and weighs 430–880 g. In summer the plumage of males and females is variegated, camouflaging the bird well on the ground. In winter the plumage is white, and the male has a black stripe at the base of the bill.

The rock ptarmigan lives in arid, rolling tundra and the alpine zone of the mountains of Europe, Asia, and North America and also in mountains as far south as the Alps, the Altai, the Khangai, and the mountains of central Japan. In winter it migrates. It nests on the ground. There are up to 12 eggs in a clutch. Only the female broods, for a period of 24–26 days. The adult ptarmigan feeds on seeds, buds, shoots, and berries, while the young feed on insects. The bird has little commercial importance.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Holder and others (1999; 2000) investigated the historical biogeography of Rock Ptarmigan in the Aleutian Islands and associated hypotheses to explain the presently recognized 6 to 7 subspecies in the islands.
Rock ptarmigan in Japan are not afraid of humans and are easy to catch (Nakamura 2010).
Approximately 90% of the total area covered by our survey is mountainous, with rock ptarmigan being the dominant species.
Key words: cycle entrainment; density dependence, delayed; dispersal; interspecific synchrony; intraspecific synchrony; Lagopus; population cycles; postdiction of cycles; Red Grouse; Rock Ptarmigan; Scotland; weather cycles.
Because Japanese rock ptarmigan have no fear of humans, we were able to observe and count birds at a close range (Nakamura 2010).
Key words: rock ptarmigan, reindeer, co-feeding, feeding crater, climate, meteorological data
Watson (1965) found cycle-like fluctuations in Rock Ptarmigan on the Cairngorms massif of Scotland, but his 21-yr study covered only one full fluctuation.
Therefore, our main objectives were 1) to identify habitat requirements of rock ptarmigan at the scale of the breeding territory using resource selection methods, and 2) to evaluate the effect of map resolution on results.
These predictions are consistent with the ecology of the Japanese rock ptarmigan L.
Five of the six species (all but rock ptarmigan) that were more abundant at mine plots also increased in response to urbanization effects at an Arctic community (Staniforth, 2002).
The vast majority of items (99.5%; n = 832) delivered to gyrfalcon nests and identified to the order level or lower belonged to one of three prey item categories: adult rock ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) (juvenile ptarmigan were not present during the gyrfalcon nestling period), arctic hare young of the year (hereafter leveret), or passerines.
This paper reports on the nesting phenology, breeding biology, and attrition rates at different stages of the breeding cycle of a population of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) at Windy Lake, Northwest Territories, from 1987 to 1989.