rock temple

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rock temple:

see templetemple,
edifice or sometimes merely an enclosed area dedicated to the worship of a deity and the enshrinement of holy objects connected with such worship. The temple has been employed in most of the world's religions. Although remains of Egyptian temples of c.2000 B.C.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Abu Simbel was one of six rock temples erected in Nubia during the ruling period of Ramses II and its construction took 20 years from 1264 BC to 1244 BC.
They include the Nubia Museum, the rock temples that were moved due to the High Dam project, and the NMEC, which acquires the largest share as it is still under construction.
Abu Simbel, is an archaeological site comprising two massive rock temples originally carved out of a mountainside during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II, it was then relocated on an artificial hill made from a domed structure high above the Aswan High Dam reservoir to avoid being submerged during the creation of Lake Nasser.
Climb up to old rock temples and don't miss the magnificently carved marble temples at Dilwara.
"Archaeology is part of human memory," said Francfort, who suggests radical solutions may be needed to protect past treasures from climate change, citing the case of the Abu Simbel rock temples in Egypt.
On day one he drags us out of bed at 4am for not one, but two, flights across the Sahara desert to visit the twin rock temples of Abu Simbel (entrance 80LE).
Only discovered in 1813, after being buried by sand, the temple complex was built by Ramsis II over the course of 20 years and consists of two massive rock temples. The complex is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of Nubia's most important monuments.
Ramses II built this temple to impress Egypt's southern neighbors, and also to reinforce the status of Egyptian religion in the region; Abu Simbel was one of six rock temples erected in Nubia during the ruling period of Ramses II and its construction took 20 years from 1264 BC to 1244 BC .