Rocket Stage


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rocket Stage

 

a detachable portion of a multistage rocket whose engine provides acceleration for the rocket over a certain portion of the flight trajectory. A rocket stage constitutes a single-stage rocket for which the remaining part of the multistage rocket—the subsequent stages and the nose section—represents the payload. A rocket stage consists of rocket engines, a load-carrying structure, fuel tanks, fuel-feed systems, guidance systems (if present), and stage-separation mechanisms. After the fuel has been consumed and engine operation has been stopped, the rocket stage separates from the multistage rocket.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
We can distinguish two main kinds of junk: Deliberate littering includes dead satellites, expended rocket stages, and discarded parts such as covers and lens caps.
The rocket stage was also largely painted white, which fits with the observed reflectance spectrum discussed above, as does the apparent cross-sectional area of 7.3 [m.sup.2].
Rocket stages from more than 600 launches now litter the wilderness regions of Khakasia, Altai and Tuva with more than 1,400 tons of "space junk."
On the other hand, re-entry vehicles and upper rocket stages require advanced high-performance --and very high-cost--heat shields, he adds, able to withstand re-entry temperatures up to 1,800[degrees]C due to the orbital speed of 7km/s andmore.
Historically, spent rocket stages have been jettisoned and lost at sea.
TheAaAaAeAeAaAeAeA object, which could be a remnant rocket stage fro Apollo mission,AaAaAeAeAaAeAeA presents a unique opportunity for astronomers to t an artificial object.
As more than 100 position measurements piled up, Paul Chodas (NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory) concluded that J002E3 was probably a leftover Saturn V rocket stage from one of the Apollo Moon missions--most likely Apollo 12, launched November 14, 1969.
The LCROSS spacecraft and a companion rocket stage made twin impacts in the Cabeus crater on October 9 that created a plume of material from the bottom of a crater that has not seen sunlight in billions of years.
The LCROSS mission consisted of two pieces — an empty rocket stage to carve into the lunar surface and a small spacecraft to measure the liquid that would fly off the surface.
In 1996 the High-Energy Transient Experiment was placed in orbit, but this X-ray satellite was unable to separate from its rocket stage. A replacement, HETE 2, has been built at MIT from spare parts and is due to fly in October.
On the other hand, the LCROSS shepherding spacecraft was flying right behind the rocket stage, thus it was able to peer down into the crater from overhead and see ejecta that did not get lofted very high.