Rocket Stage


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Rocket Stage

 

a detachable portion of a multistage rocket whose engine provides acceleration for the rocket over a certain portion of the flight trajectory. A rocket stage constitutes a single-stage rocket for which the remaining part of the multistage rocket—the subsequent stages and the nose section—represents the payload. A rocket stage consists of rocket engines, a load-carrying structure, fuel tanks, fuel-feed systems, guidance systems (if present), and stage-separation mechanisms. After the fuel has been consumed and engine operation has been stopped, the rocket stage separates from the multistage rocket.

References in periodicals archive ?
So Luna-4 and its rocket stage may later have been perturbed into a heliocentric orbit.
Rocket stages from more than 600 launches now litter the wilderness regions of Khakasia, Altai and Tuva with more than 1,400 tons of "space junk.
As if such historical connections are not enough to demand notice of the stage arrival, there also was the sheer spectacle of watching the mammoth rocket stage in transport.
Historically, spent rocket stages have been jettisoned and lost at sea.
The first available module, the Rocket Stage for Design Analysis and RTL, adds RTL extensions to OpenAccess and has proven critical to the project success.
The best guesses for what it is, other than an ApolloAaAaAeAeAaAeAeA remnant, a discarded solar panel andAaAaAeAeAaAeAeA a spent rocket stage.
The rocket stage containing the canister will orbit the Earth anywhere from six months to 10 years and afterward fall back to Earth like a meteor before vaporizing.
On the other hand, the LCROSS shepherding spacecraft was flying right behind the rocket stage, thus it was able to peer down into the crater from overhead and see ejecta that did not get lofted very high.
It might be a re-entering piece of space debris," Koschny said, referring to things like used rocket stages and decommissioned satellites and fragments from those that have broken off.
The Falcon 9 rocket stages and fairing components are also onsite and in processing for launch.
Typically, rocket stages, which house the engines, drop off once their fuel is spent and are lost at sea.
Space junk -- mostly satellites and rocket stages or fragments -- typically travels at about 28,000 kmh (17,400 mph) shortly before re-entry about 120 kilometers (75 miles) above the Earth, according to ESA.