Rodgers, John

Rodgers, John,

1773–1838, American naval officer, b. Harford co., Md. He had seen years of merchant service before he became (1798) a lieutenant in the new U.S. navy. He served in the Tripolitan WarTripolitan War
, 1800–1815, conflict between the United States and the Barbary States. Piracy had become a normal source of income in the N African Barbary States long before the United States came into existence.
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, securing senior command in 1805. In 1811, Rodgers, in command of the President, was ordered to cruise off the U.S. coast to stop the impressment of American sailors by the British frigate Guerrière. He encountered a British ship, which he apparently took to be the Guerrière, and gave chase. Accounts of what happened vary, but a battle took place, and the British ship, the Little Belt, was defeated and cut to bits. The incident was one of those leading up to the War of 1812. Rodgers, at the outbreak of that war, at once set out to pursue British ships and captured several British merchantmen. In a battle with the frigate Belvidera he was wounded by an explosion of a gun on his own vessel. He later participated in the naval defense of Baltimore. After the war he was president of the board of naval commissioners (1815–24, 1827–37) and acting secretary of the navy in 1823.

Bibliography

See biography by C. O. Paullin (1910, repr. 1967).


Rodgers, John,

1812–82, American naval officer, b. Harford co., Md.; son of John Rodgers. He became (1828) a midshipman and saw varied service. He conducted (1852–56) exploring expeditions in the N Pacific, off the coast of China, and in the Arctic. In the Civil War he served on the Atlantic coast, taking part in the bombardment of Fort Darling (1862), the attack on Fort Sumter (1863), and the capture of the ironclad Atlanta. He commanded the Asiatic fleet (1870–72). Later he was in charge of the Mare Island navy yard (1873–77) and superintendent of the U.S. Naval Observatory (1877–82).

Bibliography

See biography by R. E. Johnson (1967).

Rodgers, John

 

Born July 11, 1914, in Albany, N.Y. American geologist. Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1962); president of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences (1969).

Rodgers became a professor of geology at Yale University in 1959. His principal works deal with the stratigraphy of the Lower Paleozoic and the structural geology of the Appalachians. He was named president of the Geological Society of America in 1970 and served as secretary-general of the commission on stratigraphy of the International Geological Congress from 1952 to 1960. Rodgers was the editor of Symposium on the Cambrian System (vols. 1–3, 1956–61). He became the editor of the American Journal of Science in 1954.

Rodgers was named a foreign member of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR in 1976.

WORKS

The Tectonics of the Appalachians. New York, 1970.
In Russian translation:
Osnovy stratigrafii. Moscow, 1962.

Rodgers, John

(1773–1838) naval officer; born near Havre de Grace, Md. He served as a lieutenant in the undeclared war with France. He served in the Tripolitan War and briefly commanded the Mediterranean squadron (1805). He commanded the USS President in its defeat of the British Little Belt (1811) and became a popular hero. He performed effectively in the War of 1812 and was head of the Board of Naval Commissioners (1815–24, 1827–37).

Rodgers, John

(1812–82) naval officer; born near Havre de Grace, Md. (son of John Rodgers, 1773–1838). His naval career (1828–82) encompassed service in the Seminole War and the Civil War. He commanded the Asiatic Squadron (1870–72) and the Mare Island navy yard (1873–77). He was superintendent of the Naval Observatory (1877–82) and was the senior rear admiral on the retired list at the time of his death.
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