Rodomont


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Rodomont

gallant but blustering Saracen leader. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso; Orlando Innamorato]
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Although Ariosto presents both Orlando and Rodomont as human, he does not present them as equal.
Likewise, Rodomont's religion more than any other factor leads to his demise.
In The History of Orlando Furioso, Orlando remains the representative of the homeland, the norm, as he does in Ariosto's work; however, Greene changes the geographical origin of Ariosto's other characters so that each country, old and new, has one representative: Marsilius, Emperor of Africa; the Soldan of Egypt; Rodomont, king of Cuba; Mandricard, King of Mexico; Brandimart, King of the Isles; and Sacripant, a Saracen (Arab).
Although three of Greene's "others," Sacripant, Brandimart, and Rodomont, those that represent Arabia, the Isles, and Cuba, all die at Orlando's hand, there is no mention of what is to become of their native lands.
Thomas's main plot function is to remove the soldier Rodomont from the scene at an opportune moment by having him arrested for debt.
In order to gain access to Geneviefve, Basile disguises himself as Eustache twice (once before the action starts), and Rodomont, before the sergeants interrupt him, disguises himself as Basile disguised as Eustache.
(55) Another character, Rodomont, at one point refers to Basile as "a little Parisian bourgeois" (Turnebe, 129 [act 5, scene 3]: "un petit bourgeois de Paris").
Eustache's father Girard replies to Louyse's comment about his income with "I really believe that he would dispose of that much, and more, if it were not for his debts," while Louyse's brother fears that Rodomont, like the soldiers Messire Jean deplored in L'Eugene, "might make bold with my niece's goods, and that he might use the money from his marriage for a mount" ("Je croy bien qu'il en jouiroit, et de plus, s'il ne devoit rien"; "se fist brave des biens de ma niepce, et qu'il employast l'argent de son mariage a se monter").
Brandimart, a Christian knight held prisoner by Rodomont. Defeated by Bradamant, the maiden knight, Rodomont promises to release him along with other Christian captives.
Doralice, the Spanish princess who causes a quarrel between Rodomont and Mandricardo.
At Paris, meanwhile, the Saracens under fierce Rodomont had been defeated by the Christian champions.
Once more the Saracens besieged Paris, but as good fortune would have it dissension broke out in the attackers' camp between Rodomont and Mandricardo, a prince of Tartary, over Doralice the Spanish princess.