Rur

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Rur

 

(also Roer), a river in Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Netherlands; a right tributary of the Meuse. It is 208 km long and drains an area of approximately 2,500 sq km. The Rur originates in the Hautes Fagnes upland. Its upper and middle courses, with well-developed meanders, flow through a forested valley. The lower Rur is regulated by dams. There are freshets in the winter and spring. The Rur is not navigable. The cities of Monschau, Düren, and Jülich (Federal Republic of Germany) are on the Rur, and the port of Roermond (Netherlands) is at its mouth.

References in periodicals archive ?
Montgomery's plan had failed to account for the enemy's ability to flood the Roer River.
Infantrymen of the US Ninth Army's XII Corps left the boats behind after using them to cross the Roer River that morning.
The multiple gap-crossing requirements of the Roer River area provided German forces with the advantage of natural barriers to defend.
The Roer River landscape was full of multiple creeks, river tributaries, marshy areas and, most of all, mud that slowed or even halted the progress of armor until engineers conducted gap-crossing operations and improved road conditions.
Miller represents a substantial departure from the author's previous award-winning book, A Dark and Bloody Ground: The Hurtgen Forest and Roer River Dams, 1944-1945.
Jackson, Company I, 413th Infantry, 104th Infantry Division Timberwolves, was killed February 23, 1945, in the Roer River crossing at the start of Operation Grenade.
But while Montgomery prepared his offensive in the north, Eisenhower approved another plan by Bradley: to push through western Germany's thickly wooded Eifel region and capture massive, strategically important dams on the Roer River there.
In focusing on destroying the German army, the generals overlooked the key to reaching the Rhine River west of Cologne: the dams on the Roer River. The Americans had to cross the Rhine to crush the Third Reich, but to reach the Rhine they had to cross the Roer.
Like Sergeant Brown, my dad was at the Roer River near Rurdorf on February 23, 1945, though in the 1276th Engineers.
It was the site of the Ninth Army's crossing of the Roer River, with the 978th in support.
When the Battle of the Bulge took place, we were on the banks of the Roer River [to the east of Geilenkirchen].
When World War II broke out, Mayhall was as an ordinary soldier among hundreds of others with the 90th Infantry Division, and advanced to the position of Captain, becoming the aide-de-camp to General William Weaver taking part in numerous battles including the crossing of the Moselle and Roer Rivers, and fighting as the company commander in assausts aginst the Maginot Line.