Roethke


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Roethke

Theodore. 1908--63, US poet, whose books include Words for the Wind (1957) and The Far Field (1964)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Theodore Roethke. Retrieved from https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/ theodore-roethke
In an essay called "Poetry, Personality, and Death" (1971), Kinnell spoke of a poetry in which "the poet seeks an inner liberation by going so deeply into himself--into the worst as well as the best--that he suddenly finds he is everywhere." That's the strategy for an archetypal personal journey across a particularized landscape, like Wordsworth's "Prelude" or Roethke's "North American Sequence." Keats called it "the egotistical sublime."
To that end, there is certainly resonance in the Roethke quote for Ana--for me, this is most visible in her time in the States where she feels an inability to connect with her peers or even her family, because her soul's experiences and desires are so at odds with her current life.
You know, it was very experiential also; first person lyric narrative, free verse, influenced by Roethke if anyone, I would say, whom I was reading at the time.
Saginaw greenhouses shaped the life of Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Theodore Roethke. And in Kalamazoo, "you can't throw a rock without hitting a poet." From Ernest Hemingway's rural adventures to the gritty fiction of Joyce Carol Oates, Michigan's landscape has inspired generations of the nation's greatest storytellers.
First Class, a mainstage play by David Wagoner about Northwest poet Theodore Roethke, prompted a Central Heating Lab cabaret show that included music, poetry, and dance inspired by Roethke.
My instructor assigned us Roethke's Straw for the Fire so I must have also started a notebook.
Theirs is the tedium and minutiae of office life that has been so well described in Theodore Roethke's poem "Dolor'': "All the misery of manilla folders and mucilage ...
Throughout the volume, one encounters remarkable portraits of other artists and public figures, from Samuel Beckett and Sean 6 Riada to Robert Greacen, Edward Maguire, and Cearbhall O Dalaigh, among others, including the American poets John Berryman and Theodore Roethke. These portraits sit alongside poems in which Montague depicts members of his own family, going back several generations, but taken together they testify to his belief in poetry as a mode of art that is constantly and resonantly alert not just to the personally familiar but to all of the ways in which individuals make up a culture.
Specific topics include: the faces of evil in King Lear, evil in disguise in the form of the convent in the Victorian Protestant novel, the problem of violence in the poetry of Theodore Roethke, social evil in the writings of Eliza Orzeszkowa and Charles Dickens, evil and intertextuality in William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury and Cormac McCarthy's Outer Dark, reading and writing evil in J.M.
After two residencies at Yaddo--a "retreat for artists" in Saratoga Springs--he became drinking partners with Robert Lowell and Theodore Roethke, made the obligatory pilgrimage of any late-modernist American author to St.