Peterson, Roger Tory

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Peterson, Roger Tory,

1908–96, American ornithologist, writer, and illustrator, b. Jamestown, N.Y. He became famous with his best-selling pocket-sized Field Guide to the Birds (1934) and is known for his bold, precise drawings and paintings and his clear, succinct descriptive prose. He wrote or edited more than 50 books, many on birds, many on other facets of the natural world. Through his books and his Institute of Natural History (founded 1986 in his birthplace), Peterson was extremely influential in popularizing birding and in heightening awareness of environmental issues.

Peterson, Roger Tory

(1908–  ) ornithologist; born in Jamestown, N.Y. He began observing and drawing birds as a boy, and pursued an artist's education in New York City at the Art Students League and the National Academy of Design. He taught art and science in Brookline, Mass., for several years before publishing his Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern North America in 1934. With its novel and easy-for-the-novice pointers on how to identify birds, this guide became a major best-seller. It also helped him obtain a job with the National Audubon Society; he was art editor for Audubon magazine from 1934–43. During World War II, the Army Air Force adapted his bird-spotting methods to aircraft identification. From the late 1940s, he edited a series of field guides, lectured, and continued to publish his own works, among them Birds over America (1948), How to Know the Birds (1949), and A Bird Watcher's Anthology (1957). Wild America (1957), written in collaboration with James Fisher, was an account of a journey along the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts from Maine to Alaska. Peterson's guides and other work gave him wide influence in building popular awareness of wildlife conservation and environmental protection. He founded the Roger Tory Peterson Institute for the Study of Natural History in 1986.
References in periodicals archive ?
Richardson (The Big Bopper) and pilot Roger Peterson, a loss memorialized in Don McLean's 1971 hit "American Pie."
On February 3, 1959, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper were killed in the plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa, together with pilot Roger Peterson.
A frustrated Buddy arranged a charter flight to take him from Clear Lake, Iowa, to Moorhead, Minnesota, along with two other passengers - Ritchie Valens and JP 'The Big Bopper' Richardson - and pilot Roger Peterson. Famously, band mate Waylon Jennings gave up his seat to Richardson, who had flu.
Unfortunately, none of the three passengers or their pilot, Roger Peterson, made it to their destination in Fargo, North Dakota; the plane crashed not long after take-off, killing everyone on-board.
RAYMOND WEIL has designed a truly unique Buddy Holly watch with distinctive features and references to the artist who died aged 22 in a plane crash which also claimed the lives of Ritchie Valens, The Big Bopper, and pilot Roger Peterson in a tragedy later referred to by Don McLean as 'The Day the Music Died'.
Roger Peterson was set to pilot the plane, but he didn't know about the blizzard in his path.
"The Big Bopper" Richardson died, along with their pilot, Roger Peterson. The accident killing these three celebrities and their pilot was one in a long string of such crashes, occurring both before and after it.
The plane crashed, killing Holly, Richardson and Ritchie Valens and Roger Peterson, the pilot.
Less than a year later, Holly died in a plane crash with Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper, as well as pilot Roger Peterson.
Ninigret cleaved off half of its interests in the depot to another developer, Roger Peterson, who owns Utah Fabrication, a heavy steel fabrication company and depot tenant since 2000.
"Last year, we hosted a group of 15 or 20 students at IFMA and I've stayed in touch with many of them," explains Roger Peterson, senior vice president of business and industry facilities services at Aramark.
The couple had been married less than six months when the small plane carrying Buddy, 17-year-old Ritchie Valens, JP "the Big Bopper" Richardson and pilot Roger Peterson, plummeted from the night sky into a frozen Iowa cornfield in June, 1958.