Campagna di Roma

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Campagna di Roma

(kämpä`nyä dē rô`mä), low-lying region surrounding the city of Rome, c.800 sq mi (2,070 sq km), Campania, central Italy. A favorite residential area in Roman times, it was later largely abandoned for centuries because of the prevalence of malaria and the lack of sufficient water for cultivation. Much of the region was reclaimed in the 19th and 20th cent. It is now used to grow crops and to pasture cattle; new settlements have been founded. There are remains of Roman aqueducts and tombs.
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They were expected, too, to pay some attention to the Roman campagna itself, to insure the accuracy of the backgrounds of their historical dramas.
Even better is Mirka Benes' exemplary "Pastoralism in the Roman Baroque Villa and in Claude Lorrain: Myths and Realities of the Roman Campagna.
In between days struggling to recreate seventh-century BC conical urns, there was a chance to walk over the evocative countryside of the Roman Campagna, with its gaunt lines of surviving aqueducts, picking up potsherds in the School's survey of changing land use in antiquity.
This evocative panorama, incorporating the ruins of one of the ancient aqueducts of the Roman Campagna, the Aqua Anio Novus, has a drawn margin and must have been conceived as a work of art in its own right ($600,000-$800,000).
Peter, that swath of territory stretching from the Adriatic coast southward to the Roman Campagna, was a key element in their defensive strategy; another was the establishment of a feudal bond with the Norman kingdom of the Two Sicilies.
And while Johann Heinrich Wilhelm Tischbein's Portrait of Goethe in the Roman Campagna (1787) may not be the finest painting in the collection, it is perhaps the genius loci in terms of conveying the museum's origins as a German outpost of the Enlightenment.
The new basilica came to be viewed as the palatine papal chapel, while the old building was left to the members of the Chapter, to administer and operate some eighty-five altars on a daily basis -- a source of wealth that made the Chapter the single largest land-owner in the Roman campagna and the papal states.