Roman Catholic


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Roman Catholic

1. of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church
2. a member of this Church
References in classic literature ?
You were formally received into the Roman Catholic Church?
But it still remains in force so far as the Roman Catholic priesthood is concerned.
It is felony, as I have just told you, for a Roman Catholic priest to celebrate a marriage which may be lawfully celebrated by a parochial clergyman, a Presbyterian mini ster, and a Non-conformist minister.
The Roman Catholic believes that the Church on earth cannot stand without universal temporal Power.
Ambrose couldn't conceive why, if people must have a religion, they didn't all become Roman Catholics.
I was so complaisant, that though I would not completely engage, yet I made no scruple to be present at their mass, and to conform to all their gestures as they showed me the pattern, but I would not come too cheap; so that I only in the main encouraged them to expect that I would turn Roman Catholic, if I was instructed in the Catholic doctrine as they called it, and so the matter rested.
In addition to these establishments, there is a Roman Catholic cathedral, dedicated to Saint Francis Xavier; and a hospital, founded by the munificence of a deceased resident, who was a member of that church.
They were both Roman Catholics, and they were to be married at the chapel in Spanish Place.
Going back further, despite intense lobbying by the Roman Catholic church, Wilfrid Laurier, a Quebecer and a Roman Catholic, when in opposition, spoke against a remedial bill in the federal Parliament to force Manitoba to reinstate the publicly-funded Roman Catholic separate school system which Manitoba abolished in 1890.
There are significant non-Roman Catholic accounts of the council, such as Lukas Vischer's chapter in Alberigo's series, "The Council as an Event in the Ecumenical Movement," (2) as well as his lengthier chapter on "The Ecumenical Movement and the Roman Catholic Church" in the WCC's own history of the ecumenical movement.
The methodology incorporated survey and interview data from 10 Roman Catholic secondary schools across the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area (CMA), of which 600 surveys were randomly distributed to students and their respective parent or guardian.
Down south there are Roman Catholic, Protestant and non-denominational schools.