Roman brick


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Roman brick

Brick whose nominal dimensions are 2 in. by 4 in. by 12 in. (5 cm by 10 cm by 30 cm).
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References in classic literature ?
"The house above was said to be on the identical site of a suburban retreat of the admirable Tiberius; there was the old sinner's private theatre with the tiers cut clean to this day, the well where he used to fatten his lampreys on his slaves, and a ruined temple of those ripping old Roman bricks, shallow as dominoes and ruddier than the cherry.
The use of a distinctive pink mortar made out of lime and crushed Roman brick indicates the presence of stonemasons imported from France to supervise construction.
Roman brick with a long, linear look, plus radial (curved) brick in deep burgundy reds.
A lot of Roman brick, tile and pottery has been found at the Labour exchange site and most of it seems to have been buried since the fort went out of use.
The red roman brick facade is accentuated by rusticated limestone base, quoins and trim.
The volunteers also cleaned and sorted small artefacts which had previously been discovered at Arbeia including pieces of Roman pottery, animal bones and Roman brick and tiles.
The 25-foot-wide mansion between Fifth and Madison avenues, with a commercial zoning overlay, was fully restored in 2006 and has a neo-Renaissance facade of rusticated limestone and Roman brick. It was built in 1898 for cigar-manufacturing magnate Edward A.
Though perhaps more familiar for its skill in using timber, in this instance brick--a long, thin, almost Roman brick -is brought into play with equal assurance and sensitivity.
There is a further method to these low ceilings: They provide a sense of well-being, particularly on a rainy night when you're sitting by the fire, enclosed by the high back of the couch, the projecting ceiling, and the deep scalloped hearth built of the very same Roman brick the architect used in his Oak Park, Illinois, house.
The original library is a two-story Roman brick structure with limestone trim that was built in 1910 with partial funding from Andrew Carnegie.
Exhibited i n an ancient space, these large metal forms ended up sharing with the Roman brick and marble an idea of ancientness that transcends real time and even the physicality and weight of the work's constituent elements.