Roman tile

Roman tile

A channel-shaped, tapered, single lap, roofing tile.
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Roman tile at Grimescar by Fourth Cohort of the Breuci KIRKLEES IMAGE ARCHIVE HDAS work between 2007 and 2010 discovered part of the system of conduits that supplied fresh clean spring water to the vicus and fort area.
A Roman tile with footprint can be seen at Caerhun Hall in the Conwy Valley, an Italian painting by Pratella at the Dolce Vita restaurant, Rhos-on-Sea, a horse sculpture at the Welsh Mountain Zoo, an Indian Buddha in the Kalp Bhadra Buddhist Centre, Colwyn Bay, old beer bottles in the Cottage Loaf pub in Llandudno and a Japanese actor print at Jasmine House restaurant, Llandudno.
It sounded promising and after hours of kicking over mole hills I came back, pockets full of tesserae and bits of Roman tile, firmly convinced that I was going to be an archaeologist.
Where the first house made use of such canonic modernist features as flat roofs, and walls as clear planes, Utzon has replaced them in the new house with very Majorcan pitches, stepped gables and heavily-projecting Roman tile copings.
So why did the builder refinish the new roof with curved Roman tiles, very attractive in their own right but difficult to match up to the plain tiled roof adjacent?
Unveiling history - from left, students Michelle Humphreys, left, and Kelsie Armstrong, right, start to excavate one of the trenches; some of the Roman tiles that have been excavated at Caerleon; an artist's impression of Caerleon site * The start of an archaeological excavation by Cardiff University students at a Roman Monumental Complex outside Caerleon Fortress, Caerleon
An archeological dig in the 70s uncovered the remains of a pre-Christian shrine, Roman tiles and a pyrite mine, otherwise known as fool's gold.
They found evidence of renovations and improvements as technology progressed, including Roman tiles, Flavian pottery, a bathhouse, living quarters and five other buildings including two barns.
Objects to be displayed include Roman tiles with pictures and writing on them, coins and jewellery.
The conference will also hear from archaeologist Alex Croom on the mysteries of Roman tiles, including two from South Shields which bear the imprint of the hobnail shoes of a child who walked across them when they had just been made and had been left out to dry.