Chivalric Romance

(redirected from Romance of chivalry)

Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
Altisidora is an expert performer of literary trope, and her favorite texts have greater prestige at the turn of the seventeenth century than the romance of chivalry. (4) In contrast, the Duchess's innovation as a reader comes not from her expertise with literary texts but from her desire to make the imitation of them a community affair for women.
The Revival of the Romance of Chivalry in the Spanish Peninsula, and its Extension and Influence Abroad.
A new exhibition at Worcester Art Museum presents about 100 objects from the newly acquired collection of the Higgins Armory Museum in an integrated show that captures the romance of chivalry but also doesn't dodge the deadlier aspects of arms and armor.
In the following essay, Manuel Ferro skillfully compares Historia de las Cuevas de Salamanca (1733), by Francisco de Botelho Morais e Vasconcelos, with several literary traditions of the period, namely, "with the romance of chivalry, with utopian discourse, with the historiography of the time and with moral comedy" and the "picaresque novel." Ferro's central thesis stresses the importance of "baroque spirituality" as well as the picaresque imaginary, fantasy, and the magical eighteenth-century utopian dreams of the best possible existence.
The plot of The Fair Maid of Perth is clearly modelled on the conventions of the romance of chivalry: that of love and war, even if they are handled in an unorthodox way.
(13.) According to Weimann, the basis of authority came into question when "the traditional repertoire of signs and symbols offered by popular lore or the romance of chivalry ...
Such unambiguous commentary clearly emphasises the primary role of the knight -- as a soldier -- and strips away the romance of chivalry to reveal its true self-serving (and self-preserving) purpose: to provide both a high measure of safety to chevaliers and the opportunity to profit from the misery of war.
Amadis of GaulSpanish Amadis de GaulaProse romance of chivalry, possibly Portuguese in origin.
(Amadis of Gaul, 16th century) Spanish romance of chivalry. The first extant version (1508), consisting of four books, was compiled by Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo, also known as Garci Gutierrez Ordonez de Montalvo (fl 1500).
Thomas, Henry 1920: Spanish and Portuguese Romances of Chivalry: The Revival of the Romance of Chivalry in the Spanish Peninsula, and Its Extension and Influence Abroad.
Furthermore, this topos is found when the Canonigo explains to the Priest why he has never been able to finish reading any Romance of Chivalry:
I agree in principle with Quint's argument, but I would like to point out the irony of using the romance of chivalry, an archaic and archaizing genre, to code for this shift towards the modern.