Romanesque architecture


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Romanesque architecture: Gothic architecture, Byzantine architecture

Romanesque architecture

(800–1180)
The style that emerged from Roman and Byzantine elements; characterized by massive articulated wall structures and semicircular arches and vaults. It showed an evolution of stone vaulting and of the rib method of construction. It was characterized by heavy masonry construction, sparse ornament, and smooth plain walls with decoration derived from the structure. It also featured thick molded piers, assembled from small stones individually carved to fit.
References in periodicals archive ?
A link made literally concrete by the director and Tavoularis' extensive location scouting, which has revealed several locales with Romanesque architecture.
Combining Gothic and Romanesque architecture, with hints of French-inspired reconstruction, the magnificent Nikolaikirche normally exercises a strict vow of silence.
This church boasts both Gothic and Romanesque architecture and the present slated steeple dates back to the 18th century.
This stunning city is renowned for its magnificent Baroque and Romanesque architecture, its distinctive character and the warmth and friendliness of its people.
The facility was built for $1 million in 1939 and features Romanesque architecture of concrete, cut stone and limestone.
Using the information you have acquired in your study of Gothic an Romanesque architecture, construct an installation piece on the courthouse lawn incorporating a minimum of at least two arches of the same style.
Jean-Clet Martin's essay in this section similarly uses Deleuze-Guattari to interpret the early Middle Ages, through the 'typical' coded configurations of Romanesque architecture, the worship of relics, pilgrimage, despotism.
Preserved as a National Historic District in 1970, Pioneer Square now represents the nation's largest concentration of Victorian Romanesque architecture.
When I first read the play, I felt it was about decay," observes set designer Charlene Hall, whose research led her to a study of Romanesque architecture and the ecclesiastical history of illuminated manuscripts.
Brunelleschi used his knowledge of Gothic and Romanesque architecture in spanning the immense space covered by his dome for the cathedral of Florence, while, in such buildings as the Pazzi Chapel, the Church of San Lorenzo, the Pitti Palace (1446), the Hospital of the Innocenti (1419), and the Church of the Santo Spirito (1435), he introduced the classical elements -- columns, arches, ornamental details -- that are an integral part of Renaissance architecture.
Now, restored, it's one of San Francisco's best remaining examples of Richardsonian Romanesque architecture.