Ronsard


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Ronsard

Pierre de . 1524--85, French poet, foremost of the Pl?iade
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Main features: technical control mission for the rehabilitation of pierre de ronsard college in montmorency.
It is not surprising that Gouvy's love for art and languages manifested itself in his composing a large body of French song, and that he chose poetry almost exclusively from sixteenth century French poet Pierre de Ronsard and the group of his compatriots known as the Pleiade poets.
D'une grande diversite en effet sont ces emplois faits de La Franciade, dont les traces ecrites et documentaires, recensees de facon peu exhaustive encore aujourd'hui, temoignent de l'engouement reel que les contemporains du poete ont eprouve pour ce texte inacheve a travers lequel Ronsard avait espere realiser le reve de grand epopee francais que Joachim Du Bellay et bien d'autres avaient appele de leurs voeux (Himmelsbach 29-41; Meniel 19, 89).
Quelques-uns petrarquisent en corrigeant Petrarque, comme Maurice Sceve (6), et d'autres, comme Ronsard, l'imitent et en deviennent les emules (7).
The exhibition runs at Fountain Fine Art, Cardiff, from tomorrow until April 18 Florilege des Amours de Ronsard In 1941, Matisse embarked on one of his most complicated and successful printmaking projects, Florilege des Amours de Ronsard, illustrating the love poems of 16th century French Renaissance poet Pierre de Ronsard.
Williams turns in Chapter Two to Pierre de Ronsard to consider the poet's treatment of both political and sexual aggression through classical modes-- especially that of Ovid's Metamorphoses--and subjects that include the Perseus and Andromeda myth.
But it also adds a little-discussed dimension to the popular image of Pierre Ronsard, author of the first of the pieces performed on that day, the dramatic poem, Bergerie.
Ronsard received about 400,000 euro in financial support from regional organisations.
In the concluding poem of his Sonets pour Helene (1578), Pierre de Ronsard subtly summarizes the nature of his poetic creativity.
The "Queen's Day" in question here is Shrove Sunday, 13 February 1564, when Catherine of Medici, Queen Mother of France, produced two lavish court spectacles at Fontainebleau: a Bergerie composed by Ronsard and published in revised form the following year in his Elegies, Mascarades et Bergerie, and a five-act dramatic adaptation of the Ginevra episode of Ariosto's Orlando furioso (4.51-6.16), of which nothing survives except brief mentions by contemporary witnesses like Castelnau and Brantome and some incidental texts--two "triumphs" and an epilogue by Ronsard and four anonymous intermedes preserved by Brantome.
The incomplete 1926 edition, Les Chansons de Calianthe, fille de Ronsard, does not do her poetry justice.
But the race was more notable for the two suspensions handed down by the stewards - 10 days to Kylie Manser after they decided she had failed to take all reasonable permissible measures through the race on the Noel Chancetrained Saint Eric who finished sixth, and the two days given to Richard Evans on second-past-the-post Ronsard.