Resorption

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resorption

[rē′sȯrp·shən]
(petrology)
The process by which a magma redissolves previously crystallized minerals.
(physics)
Absorption or, less commonly, adsorption of material by a body or system from which the material was previously released.

Resorption

 

(1) In physiology, repeated assimilation; the same as absorption.

(2) In pathology and pathological physiology, the same as resolution. In cases of leukoses, for example, resorption of the bone develops very intensively and is accompanied by rarefaction and the complete resolution of the bony frame.

References in periodicals archive ?
Radiographic assessment included evaluation of pathological external or internal root resorption, periapical or inter-radicular radiolucency and widening of the periodontal ligament (PDL).
In traumatized deciduous teeth, radiographic sequelae associate enamel fracture and inflammatory root resorption with concussion and lateral luxation.
Some side effects have been reported in non-vital tooth bleaching including external root resorption, alteration of morphology of dental tissues, modification of the properties of restorative materials and reduction of tooth resistance and adhesion.
The teeth were clinically vital, radio-graphically normal, with no pulp obliteration, and had no signs and symptoms of ankylosis or root resorption (Figures 7 and 8).
Deng, "Three-dimensional quantification of orthodontic root resorption with time-lapsed imaging of micro-computed tomography in a rodent model," Journal of X-Ray Science and Technology, vol.
Resume of the literature on root resorption. Angle Orthodon 1942;12:28-38.
Impaction side (right or left), localization (buccal, central, or palatal), and root resorption levels in lateral teeth variables related to follicle size were evaluated on the CBCT images.
For example, the 3D reconstruction teeth or bone model can help make the orthodontic treatment plan, construct individual appliances, and evaluate treatment results, especially to assess the root resorption caused by tooth movement in orthodontics.
Conventional periapical radiographs provide limited clinical information with respect to the three dimensional defect such as root resorption. It is unable to reveal the exact location and nature of the resorptive defect or thickening of remaining root canal dentine particularly in the bucco-lingual direction.
Ne et al., taking into account clinical radiological and histopathological manifestations, have presented four types of external resorption: external surface resorption, external inflammatory root resorption, replacement resorption and ankyloses [2].