Roscoe, William

Roscoe, William,

1753–1831, English historian and author. He was called to the bar in 1774, and later, as a member of Parliament, fought against the slave trade (1806). The Life of Lorenzo de' Medici (1795), his principal historical work, received praise, but his Life of Leo X (4 vol., 1805) was severely criticized. In 1806 he contributed a children's classic, The Butterfly's Ball and the Grasshopper's Feast, to the Gentleman's Magazine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that his statue also stands in St George's Hall with William Roscoe, William Brown and William Gladstone shows the esteem with which the people of Liverpool must have held him.
Chapter 2, "The Poetics of Antislavery," surveys works by 15 poets--Anna Letitia Barbauld, Joel Barlow, William Cowper, Thomas Day, Theodore Dwight, Bryan Edwards, Philip Freneau, David Humphreys, Hannah More, Thomas Morris, William Roscoe, William Shenstone, John Singleton, Phillis Wheatley, and Ann Yearsley--whose verse makes use of what Gould names "the language of commercial exchange.
This council resolves that all streets, squares and public places named after those who were involved in promoting or profiteering from the slave trade, such as Tarleton, Manesty and Clarence, should be renamed' this to coincide with the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in 2007 and the physical regeneration and renewal of the city' and that new names celebrating those who opposed slavery and who represent diversity and the contemporary challenge of racial harmony - such as William Roscoe, William Wilberforce, Thomas Clarkson, and Anthony Walker- should be substituted in their place' and that the city's Maritime Museum be invited to give advice on this matter to the appropriate committee.