Greenhow, Rose O'Neal

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Greenhow, Rose O'Neal

(?–1864) Confederate spy; born in Washington, D.C. The widow of a prominent physician, Robert Greenhow, she passed information on Union battle strategy to Confederate generals. She was tried for treason (1862) and exiled. She went to England and amassed gold for the Confederate cause. She died in a shipwreck off North Carolina.
References in periodicals archive ?
Read the letters of Rose O'Neal Greenhow a Confederate spy and diary entries of a 10-year-old girl in Atlanta.
In addition to serving in the armed forces, women also worked as spies--Belle Boyd, Rose O'Neal Greenhow, and Elizabeth Van Lew being the most famous.
On the other side of the Mason-Dixon Line, Rose O'Neal Greenhow is reported to have spoken what could be the creed of the female spy: "God gave me both a brain and a body, and I shall use them both in the defense of the Confederacy
Women such as Mary Chesnut, Belle Boyd, Rose O'Neal Greenhow, and Eliza Frances Andrews are represented.
Leonard moves from the relatively familiar stories of the "big five" of female espionage (Belle Boyd, Rose O'Neal Greenhow, Antonia Ford, Elizabeth Van Lew, and Pauline Cushman) to the tales of countless "lost heroines" who risked life and limb to pass on military intelligence, nurse and inspire the soldiers, and register their resistance to the enemy.